Newcastle Loves a Brilliant Comeback

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), February 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

Newcastle Loves a Brilliant Comeback


EVERYBODY loves a comeback.

But when it comes to breathtaking resurrections, Newcastle United appear to be willing cast members.

Never mind Escape To Victory, Sly Stallone and all of that, United have the knack of writing their own crazy scripts.

Following their unforgettable 4-4 draw against Arsenal on Saturday, LEE RYDER relives five more classic comebacks.

NEWCASTLE 4 LEICESTER CITY 3 February 2, 1997 IT all seemed to be going to plan when Robbie Elliott steered in a third-minute opener for the Mags.

And with Kenny Dalglish renowned for the defensive stability in his teams, United seemed capable of holding on to the lead.

But Martin O'Neill's side stunned the black-and-whites when Matt Elliott, Steve Claridge and Emile Heskey put Leicester 3-1 up.

Indeed the Foxes looked home and dry, but Alan Shearer had other ideas.

Big Al thumped home a wonderful free-kick on 77 minutes, but was far from finished.

With seven minutes left, Shearer pulled United level.

And then the icing on the cake came when Rob Lee rolled the ball to the back post and Shearer applied a poacher's finish to send the Toon Army into raptures.

NEWCASTLE: Hislop, Watson, Elliott, Albert, Peacock, Batty, Lee, Gillespie (Ginola, 68), Asprilla (Clark, 87), Shearer, Ferdinand. NEWCASTLE 5 LEICESTER CITY 4 January 25, 1990 WHEN Newcastle signed Scotland skipper Roy Aitken in a big-money move from Celtic, the arrival of the Scot was supposed to shore up the United midfield.

Little did anybody know, what was about to unfold on his action-packed debut.

It was all going to plan when Mark McGhee headed the Toon ahead.

Leicester though soon turned it around and went 2-1 up.

Micky Quinn rifled United level again before half-time and it was all square at the break.

Leicester regained the lead after the break before a young Kevin Campbell extended that advantage to 4-2. At that stage it looked like the Foxes had the points sewn up, but sub John Gallacher pulled back what looked like a late consolation.

In keeping with the mad goal rush, Quinn stabbed home a second equaliser of the day near the end.

In the final minute - with his back to the Gallowgate - McGhee superbly turned his man and smashed one home on the turn.

NEWCASTLE: Burridge, Anderson, Stimson, Aitken, Scott, Dillon, Fereday, Brock, O'Brien, Quinn, McGhee. …

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