Key to Energy Security: Renewable Energy Projects

By Waters, Doug | Soldiers Magazine, January 2011 | Go to article overview

Key to Energy Security: Renewable Energy Projects


Waters, Doug, Soldiers Magazine


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

THE Army has implemented a broad range of projects to meet its goals for 7.5 percent substitution of renewable energy by 2013. The projects listed are examples of the Army's continuing effort to improve energy security.

The Army has three hydropower facilities and has implemented 28 solar projects in 16 states, Germany and Italy.

The Army National Guard Training Center in Sea Girt, N.J., constructed a photovoltaic solar electric power parking canopy system.

A Fort Bliss, Texas, solar energy project supplies electricity to an administration building, which allowed Fort Bliss to partially remove this building from the grid.

The Nevada Army National Guard is constructing solar shade structure arrays at Carson City and Las Vegas.

Fort Carson, Colo., constructed a solar array on 12 acres of a closed landfill--the Army's largest solar power site.

Fort Knox, Ky., harvests biogenic renewable methane gas from Devonian-shale.

Tooele Army Depot, Utah, installed solar walls on 14 buildings, and has the first wind turbine at an active Army installation. The Army has other wind turbine projects in seven states. …

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