Sign the Colombia Trade Pact Further Delay Will Hinder Economic Growth and Cost Jobs

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

Sign the Colombia Trade Pact Further Delay Will Hinder Economic Growth and Cost Jobs


Byline: Carlos M. Gutierrez, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It has been four years since the United States and Colombia signed a reciprocal trade agreement. Unfortunately, the agreement has yet to be implemented. In June 2007, then-President George W. Bush sent the agreement to Congress but the Democratic majority in the House refused to vote on it. The new Republican Majority in the House must ensure a vote on this agreement, as it will create U.S. jobs and make good on a promise to an important ally.

Passing the agreement would create U.S. jobs by eliminating tariffs on U.S. exports to Colombia. Tariff elimination would enable U.S. exporters to compete on a level playing field with exporters from countries such as Canada and those in the European Union whose products already enter Colombia duty-free because of their existing trade agreements. It also would level the playing field between the United States and Colombia. This is because most Colombian goods already enter the United States duty-free, while most U.S. exports to Colombia face significant tariffs.

Longtime opponents of free trade oppose passage of the agreement, arguing that Colombia should be punished for violence affecting union members. They contend that Colombia is particularly dangerous for union members. In fact, a study by the highly regarded nonpartisan Center for Strategic and International Studies showed that union members were less likely to be targeted than other Colombians. In recent decades, Colombia has suffered tremendous and heart-wrenching violence at the hands of drug lords and terrorists. The violence has touched nearly every corner of Colombia's soil as the government has struggled for control of the country. It has touched nearly every family. It is misleading to suggest that union members have been disproportionately affected by the violence.

Fortunately, violence against all people in Colombia has dropped dramatically over the past decade as terrorist groups such as FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) have been marginalized. Under former President Alvaro Uribe's leadership, the people of Colombia regained control of their country. At a time when the Colombian people are celebrating the gradual return of peace to their country, they must wonder why some in Washington say they have not done enough to deserve a trade agreement with America. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sign the Colombia Trade Pact Further Delay Will Hinder Economic Growth and Cost Jobs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.