Scientists Press for Dementia Research Funding

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 9, 2011 | Go to article overview

Scientists Press for Dementia Research Funding


SCIENTISTS will today call for more funding for research into dementia. A charity will also claim dementia research is the poor relation to other diseases, even though it costs the UK economy more than cancer and heart disease combined.

The calls comes as a poll today reveals that more people fear developing dementia than cancer or even death itself.

Professor Julie Williams, the Cardiff University researcher who discovered genes linked to Alzheimer's disease and is also the chief scientific adviser for Alzheimer's Research UK, said: "We're on the verge of a profound understanding of dementia and one that could lead us to the treatments we need, but we need help to get there.

"Investing in dementia research now will pay dividends, heading off the forecast explosion in numbers living with the condition and the crippling economic costs that come alongside."

And Professor Michael Owen, director of Cardiff University's Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute, said: "If we are to find effective treatments that are so urgently needed, dementia research must be made a national priority.

"Dementia researchers in Cardiff and across the UK are making real progress, and with support from Alzheimer's Research UK, scientists are making important breakthroughs. …

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