Cameron's Betrayal of Our Troops

The Mirror (London, England), February 10, 2011 | Go to article overview

Cameron's Betrayal of Our Troops


Byline: GREIG BOX TURNBULL; TOM MCTAGUE

DAVID Cameron today stands accused by Labour of breaking 10 crucial election pledges to Britain's armed forces.

Top of his list of empty promises is his failure to make law the Military Covenant, the historic pact setting out Britain's duty to its fighting men and women.

Other betrayals by him and his Lib Dem sidekicks include failing to provide better homes for our heroes and improved care for Forces families and veterans.

Shadow Defence Secretary Jim Murphy, whose team drew up the damning dossier, said: "Each day brings a new broken promise from this Conservative-led Government.

"The service community will feel a deep sense of disappointment that their actions in Government do not live up to their pre-election rhetoric.

"It appears they don't know what they are doing but even worse, that they have lost their sense of right and wrong."

The Royal British Legion also tore into Mr Cameron over his backtracking on the Military Covenant vow.

Director General Chris Simpkins said: "The covenant is a concept we think should be enshrined in law so the public can hold any Government's feet to the fire about whether it is being properly honoured and respected."

It comes as war heroes and Forces' widows face 1% pension cuts from April - a scandal that has seen several military top figures support the Mirror's Pensions Fit For Heroes campaign.

And an Army Families Federation poll has found nearly 80% of troops have considered quitting over poor wages.

Mr Murphy said the PM had also let down the services with empty pledges on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder treatment, shorter tours of duty, dedicated military wards, wages and injury payouts. …

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