Exhibitions Lure Visitors to Artistic Variations; City's Galleries Portray How Different Artists Use Particular Mediums or Subject Matter

The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia), February 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Exhibitions Lure Visitors to Artistic Variations; City's Galleries Portray How Different Artists Use Particular Mediums or Subject Matter


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ONE of the pleasures of visiting galleries whether to see individual exhibitions or group shows, is having the opportunity to encounter a variety of art forms. To see how different artists use a particular medium, or interpret their subject matter can be a rewarding, disappointing, or humbling experience.

Made Creative Space

A new gallery in town is a creative art space situated upstairs at 174 Margaret Street. It is open Wednesday-Friday 10am-2pm, and Saturdays and Sundays 1pm-4pm, and promises a lively exhibition program presenting the work of emerging and established artists. The inaugural exhibitions include C[pounds sterling]Follow the Mellow Brick RoadC[yen] a series of chalk and charcoal drawings by Simon Mee.

These works have an old-world quality reminiscent of Victorian journals and postcards, yet the more one looks, the more one sees a darker side, an edge that recalls the doll images created by Hans Bellmer or James Ensor. Very different drawings comprise the exhibition, C[pounds sterling]Mind MonstersC[yen] the work of Ester de Boer.

These elaborately detailed stories are peopled by exotic hybrid creatures and prosaic personages inhabiting a nightmare world that at times appears alarmingly familiar. De Boer sustains intrigue and visual interest across the scale from postage stamp to poster. Her population of grotesques and mutants with their remnants of text exist in a haunting parallel universe. The third body of work is C[pounds sterling]Waking,C[yen] an installation by Christian Low.

Pliable plastic rods act as an armature for rolls and rolls of cling wrap that define an eerie, glistening passageway rather like entering a cocoon. …

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