Winning Playwrights Hold Auditions for Their Works

Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia), February 19, 2011 | Go to article overview

Winning Playwrights Hold Auditions for Their Works


Byline: SYNDA TURNBULL

IF you are interested in treading the boards, then get along next Saturday night to Noosa Arts Theatre, for the information session and playreading of the three finalists in the National One-Act Playwriting Competition.

The play reading, starting at 7.30pm, will offer actors the chance to hear the three plays read and choose what roles to audition for.

There are two dramas and a

comedy, with men and women of all ages required.

Nothing, a comedy by Mark

Langham (NSW) requires two men aged 40 - 50 and a woman aged about 34. Three friends spend a day in the shed getting drunk and

contemplating life, and talking about nothing. Or are they?

Star Crossed, by Jenny Bullimore (VIC), requires two very strong actors a a male and female, aged in their late 20s to early 30s, for this drama about a young high school teacher and his friendship with a female student.

The Knock On The Door, a drama by Bruce Olive (QLD), requires a female aged 20-30 to play a pregnant woman preparing for the arrival of her first child, a male about 18 to play a soldier going off to World War I, and a male and female, both middle aged, to play the boy's

parents. This heartbreaking play is mainly set during World War I, with a twist!

Auditions will be held on Tuesday, March 15 at 7.30pm at Noosa Arts Theatre, 163 Weyba Road,

Noosaville (next to the AFL ground).

For more information phone Synda on 5449 9972 during office hours. …

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