Briefly Music

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Briefly Music


Byline: The Register-Guard

Hell's Belles are back with a new singer

The all-female AC/DC tribute band Hell's Belles returns to the McDonald Theatre, 1010 Willamette St., today with guest vocalist Patrice Pike.

Local band the Dead Americans open the show at 8 p.m.

Pike appears in recent Hell's Belles concert videos wearing Brian Johnson's trademark newsboy style hat, singing hits such as "Back in Black."

Pike is an Austin, Texas-based rock singer who co-founded the jam band Sister Seven when she was barely out of high school. A news release says Billboard magazine proclaimed her "one of the finest up-and-coming contemporary rock singers in America."

"Hell's Belles are about empowering women to get 'upfront' in rock," the release says. "Representing for a whole new generation of women that won't be intimidated, Hell's Belles actively support women-populated bands."

The Dead Americans features Kyra Kelly, Zak Johnson, Terry Travis, Josh Britton and John Raden.

Tickets are $17.

Art-music project opens downtown

Sonny Smith's "100 Records" exhibition opens today at one of the new satellite locations for the Downtown Initiative for the Visual Arts.

The show is the culmination of a massive, yearlong project. It is presented by Bernard Brooks, the University of Oregon Arts Administration Program and DIVA.

During a residency at the Headlands Center for the Arts in Sausalito, Calif., Smith, a San Francisco- based musician and writer, started creating an "alternate underground history of pop music by devising the personas and histories of dozens of fictitious bands spread over numerous pop genres," a news release says.

Then, with his band the Sunsets, he recorded 100 singles in the style of each group. He got help from members of the Fresh & Onlys, Thee Oh Sees, the Sandwitches, the Kelley Stoltz Band and Ty Segall. …

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