The Last Plane out; Final Flight Carries Last Brits in Libya to Safety as Gaddafi Arms Militia for Civil War

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), February 27, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Last Plane out; Final Flight Carries Last Brits in Libya to Safety as Gaddafi Arms Militia for Civil War


Byline: BEN SPENCER

THE final rescue flight for Brits fleeing Libya left Tripoli last night as the country hurtled closer to civil war.

The plane took 53 British nationals out of the stricken city at 6pm. It was part of a massive evacuation from the country by land, sea and air.

They scrambled to get out as embattled Colonel Gaddafi threw open his arsenal of weapons to civilian militia.

The operations of the British Embassy in Tripoli were suspended and its staff evacuated on the last Governmentchartered flight from the capital. Meanwhile, two RAF Hercules planes evacuated more than 150 civilians from desert locations south of Benghazi to Malta.

Earlier in the day, hundreds had escaped Libya by boat including almost 70 Brits on board HMS Cumberland.

Their desperate bid to escape came as Gaddafi announced plans to arm his civilian supporters in a move that could push Libya into civil war.

And last night, there were reports of further carnage in Sabratha, 40 miles west of Tripoli. It was claimed dozens were "severely wounded" after a pro-Gaddafi battalion opened fire.

The UN Security Council was meeting last night to discuss action against Gaddafi with a draft resolution calling for an arms embargo, travel ban and moves to freeze a multi-billion pound fortune.

Meanwhile, US President Barack Obama said the Libyan leader should step down and leave the country "now".

The White House said: "The president stated that when a leader's only means of staying in power is to use mass violence against his own people, he has lost the legitimacy to rule and needs to do what is right for his country by leaving now".

The last government rescue flight for Brits arrived in Tripoli yesterday afternoon. The 737 had 148 seats and there were believed to be around 50 UK nationals in the city.

Foreign Secretary William Hague and Scottish government external affairs minister Fiona Hyslop had earlier urged all Britons go to Tripoli airport.

However, efforts were continuing last night to rescue an estimated 300 British oil workers in remote locations in the country. SAS troops are understood to be ready to move in to evacuate the workers if needed.

Hyslop said oil companies had been working with the Scottish government to bring as many home as possible.

She added: "We are continuing to work with the FCO to ensure those individuals still to leave Libya are able to do so as swiftly and as safely as possible."

Scots who were among more than 207 people transported from Libyan port city Benghazi to Malta by HMS Cumberland praised the Royal Navy rescue.

The frigate arrived in Malta in the early hours of yesterday and Brits onboard were due to be flown back to the UK as soon as possible. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Last Plane out; Final Flight Carries Last Brits in Libya to Safety as Gaddafi Arms Militia for Civil War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.