BODY PARTS FRESH FROM 3D PRINTER; Doctors Are Able to Practice on Plaster Models

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), February 28, 2011 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

BODY PARTS FRESH FROM 3D PRINTER; Doctors Are Able to Practice on Plaster Models


Byline: Mary Griffin

DOCTORS in Coventry have used a printer to create 3D replicas of damaged body parts on which to practice.

The pioneering technique has already been used by a surgeon to get to grips with an exact replica of a woman's fractured pelvis before operating on the real thing.

From bone and tissue scans, the university boffins can print out replica bones and organs, layer by layer, in plaster to form a three-dimensional model.

And some doctors reckon that, instead of printing parts for practise, they could one day be printing replacement body parts.

Dr Richard Wellings, of University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire, said: "Technology is coming on leaps and bounds.

"We could be looking at printing not just in plastics and metals but in different materials. "And one of the most exciting things is printing using stuff that's analogous to the crystals in bone."

The 3D printers at the university's Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG) are similar to standard ink-jet printers found in offices across the city.

But instead of printing on to a flat piece of paper, they print onto plaster which is transformed layer-by-layer into a 3D object.

Costing around pounds 30,000 each, they are widely used in engineering, to produce one-off prototypes for car parts and other gadgets without having to create expensive moulds.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

BODY PARTS FRESH FROM 3D PRINTER; Doctors Are Able to Practice on Plaster Models
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?