Building Blocks for Engineers of Future

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), February 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

Building Blocks for Engineers of Future


Byline: EMMA THOMPSON

What does a career as a building services engineer involve? A building services engineer designs, fits and maintains the essential services and equipment found in new and existing buildings.

This would include: water, gas and electricity supplies, as well as lighting, heating and air-conditioning, plus security systems and lifts/escalators. Duties would include: drawing up installation plans using computer aided design (CAD); testing and checking services and carrying out any necessary improvements; making sure jobs meet building regulations and health and safety requirements; overseeing inspection and maintenance programmes and keeping up to date with new product developments. Also assessing the energy efficiency and environmental impact of buildings.

What skills are needed? You need excellent engineering, IT and design skills, as well as problem-solving ability and strong decision-making skills.

The ability to picture and explain design ideas is also needed, in addition to excellent leadership, teamworking and people skills. What training do you need? One way to qualify as an engineer is to start out as a trainee technician on an engineering apprenticeship scheme. To get on to a scheme you will usually need at least three GCSEs (grades A-C), or equivalent qualifications.

Alternatively, you could take a college qualification which would teach you some of the skills needed. Courses include BTEC National Certificates and Diplomas in: Building Services Engineering; Operations and Maintenance Engineering; and Mechanical Engineering.

Once you reach technician level, you could continue your training on the job, working your way up to engineer level.

With a higher-level qualification such as a foundation degree, BTEC HNC/HND, degree or postgraduate award in building services engineering (or a related engineering subject), you may be able to join a company as a trainee engineer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Building Blocks for Engineers of Future
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.