Do We Still Need Unions? Yes

By Klein, Ezra | Newsweek, March 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Do We Still Need Unions? Yes


Klein, Ezra, Newsweek


Byline: Ezra Klein

Why they're Worth Fighting For.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's effort two weeks ago to end collective bargaining for public employees in his state was the worst thing to happen to the union movement in recent memory--until it unexpectedly became the best thing to happen to the union movement in recent memory. Give the man some credit: in seven days, Walker did what unions have been trying and failing to do for decades. He united the famously fractious movement, reknit its emotional connection with allies ranging from students to national Democratic leaders, and brought the decline of organized labor to the forefront of the national agenda. The question is: will it matter?

At this point, it's a safe bet that the proposal Walker is pushing in Wisconsin won't spread far. Ambitious Republican governors in Indiana and Florida have backed away as unions have made it clear that trying to yank away collective-bargaining rights is a lot of pain for modest gain. But therein lies the problem: a "win" for unions here is no win at all, but, at best, the avoidance of a loss. It doesn't end their seemingly decades-long slide into irrelevance--fewer than 7 percent of private workers are unionized, down from about 25 percent in the 1970s. It doesn't earn them new members, or make it easier to organize Walmart, or create a new model for labor relations that's better suited to the modern economy. But it does give them a fleeting instant in which America is willing to ask questions that have been ignored for years: Do we need unions? And, if so, how can we get them back? What we're about to find out is whether the unions have answers. In recent years they haven't. "They seem like a legacy institution and not an institution of the future," says Andy Stern, the former president of the Service Employees International Union.

But unions still have a crucial role to play in America. First, they give workers a voice within--and, when necessary, leverage against--their employer. That means higher wages, but it also means that workers can go to their managers with safety concerns or ideas to improve efficiency and know that they'll not only get a hearing, they'll be protected from possible reprisals. …

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