Notes for Notes


The Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library at Harvard University has received a major private collection of books and scores devoted to the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Known as the "Biblioteca Mozartiana Eric Offenbacher," the collection was assembled by Dr. Eric Offenbacher of Seattle, Washington, over a period of nearly four decades. It includes two autograph manuscripts of Mozart and an autograph letter of his son Karl, and nearly one hundred first and early editions of the composer's works, the vast majority printed before 1800. The collection also contains many rare early biographical works and an extensive repertory of other writings about Mozart and his family. Facsimile publications, microfilms, and photocopies of Mozart autographs in libraries throughout the world are also included in the collection. Harvard plans to augment this collection with new acquisitions from the antiquarian market, thus further developing their Mozart holdings.

The primed materials from this collection are housed at the Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library, the manuscripts at Harvard's Houghton Library. A checklist of materials is in preparation and can be accessed at the Loeb Music Library's World-Wide Web site (http://www.rism.harvard.edu/MusicLibrary/Welcome.html); individual books and scores in the collection can be searched in HOLLIS, Harvard University's online library catalogue (telnet to: hollis.harvard.edu).

The International Carillon Congress will take place 9-13 August 1998 in Mechelen and Leuven, Belgium. Part of this event is a congress on campanology (the science of bells and carillons) under the sponsorship of the Catholic University of Leuven. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Notes for Notes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.