'International Aid Is Our Moral Duty' as He Launches a Radical Review of Britain's Aid Policy, International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell Tells Political Editor Jonathan Walker Why Too Much Development Spending Has Gone to Waste in the Past

The Birmingham Post (England), March 3, 2011 | Go to article overview

'International Aid Is Our Moral Duty' as He Launches a Radical Review of Britain's Aid Policy, International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell Tells Political Editor Jonathan Walker Why Too Much Development Spending Has Gone to Waste in the Past


Much of Britain's aid over the past 60 years was spent on propping up dictators, the International Development Secretary has admitted.

Civil servants had blocked attempts to monitor whether money was well spent, said Andrew Mitchell. The Sutton Coldfield MP delivered the blunt verdict on Britain's aid effort as he launched a radical shake-up of Britain's overseas aid policy.

Funding will be scrapped for countries such as Iraq, Kosovo, Niger and Vietnam, which it is believed do not need the money. And Britain will end grants for a range of international bodies which have been judged wasteful, including the International Labour Organisation. An independent watchdog has also been appointed to monitor spending.

But there will be no turning back over the Government's decision to protect the pounds 7 billion international aid budget, even though cuts are being made in other departments. The Government remains committed to providing 0.7 per cent of Britain's Gross National Income as aid from 2013, and total spending is due to rise to pounds 11 billion by 2015 Aid to India will also continue, even though the country is seen as an emerging economic powerhouse with its own nuclear weapons and space programmes.

Millions of Indians still live in extreme poverty, Mr Mitchell said.

Speaking to the Birmingham Post, Mr Mitchell said: "This is a topic which animates our constituents more than almost any other. When they think that aid money is spent well, they are really supportive. Look at the generosity from people across Birmingham following the dreadful humanitarian catastrophe in Pakistan following the floods.

"When they think it's being stolen or corruptly used, people go ballistic about that. And quite right too, because it is their hard-earned money not being spent properly."

Britain had never before examined whether the aid it provided was actually achieving results, Mr Mitchell said, and senior civil servants had blocked previous attempts to introduce an independent watchdog to monitor aid.

"My predecessor, Hilary Benn, was interested in this but he was sort of nobbled by 'Sir Humphreys'.

"We have said it has to be independent of us, ministers and the department."

A new independent evaluator would be based in the Scottish Office where Mr Mitchell could not interfere, he said. "It's a big change. It's the type of promise you make in opposition and rather regret if you are doing by job in government."

Aid has been used as an extension of the Cold War until this ended with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, he said.

"I think that before the Berlin Wall came down - people say that development over the past 60 years has failed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'International Aid Is Our Moral Duty' as He Launches a Radical Review of Britain's Aid Policy, International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell Tells Political Editor Jonathan Walker Why Too Much Development Spending Has Gone to Waste in the Past
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.