EQUAL RIGHTS? WRONG; 100 Years on. and Study Says Women Are Still Getting Raw Deal

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), March 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

EQUAL RIGHTS? WRONG; 100 Years on. and Study Says Women Are Still Getting Raw Deal


Byline: Annie Brown

AS the world celebrates the centenary of International Women's Day today, sexism is thriving in the UK.

In a new survey, 60 per cent of women aged 15 to 30 said they had been victims of sexist behaviour.

And almost half of women said they didn't feel they were treated as equals.

Amnesty International's UK director Kate Allen said many women in the UK still felt like "second class citizens".

She said: "These worrying results have thrown a light on the wide chasm that still exists between men and women, despite the enormous social and economic progress made in the last century.

"Unless attempts are made to change such attitudes in every section of society, some women will always be treated as second-class citizens."

The poll conducted by campaign group EQUALS said complaints about sexist behaviour ranged from derogatory remarks to inappropriate touching.

In the last 100 years, dating back to the Suffragette movement, women have fought and died for equal rights yet today only one in five admit to being feminists.

And women are still seen as homemakers and men as the breadwinners.

Six in 10 women are still responsible for childcare in the home, despite 80 per cent feeling it should be a shared responsibilty.

And only two per cent of women said they earned more than their male partners.

The "new man" seems to be a figment of the imagination with two-thirds of women still doing the housework The struggle to juggle a career and home life still leaves six out of 10 women frazzled.

And 20 per cent felt that, unlike their male colleagues, they were judged more on their looks than their skills.

Esme Peach, co-ordinator of the EQUALS campaign, said: "While we've come a long way in terms of equality between the sexes, gender-based stereotypes and assumptions still shape our daily lives.

"In 2011, we should be moving towards a society where a man's role as a parent is valued just as much as a woman's role as the breadwinner, and where men working as primary school teachers, or women working as plumbers, are commonplace."

International Women's Day (IWD) is now an official holiday in countries from Afghanistan to Mongolia, although it is unlikely many women are actually allowed to celebrate it.

In some countries, the tradition sees men honouring their mothers, wives and colleagues with flowers and small gifts or children handing presents to their mothers and grandmothers. …

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EQUAL RIGHTS? WRONG; 100 Years on. and Study Says Women Are Still Getting Raw Deal
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