Nuclear Powerhouse

By Lipman, Joanne | Newsweek, March 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

Nuclear Powerhouse


Lipman, Joanne, Newsweek


Byline: Joanne Lipman

France's most powerful businesswoman believes now is the time for the next atomic boom.

The Middle East is in turmoil, oil prices have skyrocketed, the cost of gas is through the roof. All of which is good news--if you're Anne Lauvergeon.

Lauvergeon may be the world's most effective proselytizer for nuclear energy. "Atomic Anne," as she's known, heads France's Areva, the largest builder of nuclear reactors on the planet. The 51-year-old executive, a perennial member of the Forbes most-powerful-women list (recently outranking Melinda Gates, Meg Whitman, and Queen Elizabeth, though trailing Lady Gaga), has been the guiding force behind her country's massive push into nuclear energy, which today fuels 75 percent of all its electricity. And now, she believes, nuclear's next big global moment has arrived. "The cheap price of oil and gas is over for the future," she tells NEWSWEEK. "Nuclear isn't the only solution, but it is part of the solution."

The world may still need convincing.

While a handful of countries rely primarily on nuclear power--tiny Lithuania is 85 percent nuclear--resistance remains strong elsewhere. In the U.S., which is just 20 percent nuclear-powered, President Obama has championed it as a way to wean the country off fossil fuels, devoting $36 billion of his latest budget to nuclear projects. But despite somewhat successful efforts to rebrand nuclear as a clean-energy source, the industry hasn't fully outgrown the stigma of the 1979 Three Mile Island disaster.

If Lauvergeon is correct that now is a turning point, the timing couldn't be better for her. The hard-charging CEO has morphed from a media darling in her home country ("You can't fire me. I am an icon in this country," she reportedly told a minister who criticized her) to an embattled titan, following missteps that included the loss of a $40 billion nuclear project in Abu Dhabi. She has until June, when her current mandate expires, to turn things around--or she will be removed from the government-controlled Areva by French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who has been a major supporter but appears to have soured on her. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nuclear Powerhouse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.