A New Newsweek

By Brown, Tina | Newsweek, March 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

A New Newsweek


Brown, Tina, Newsweek


Byline: Tina Brown

It's not just another week for this magazine. It's a new day--and, we hope, a new era.

The issue in your hands celebrating Women in the World was produced by a still-evolving team of editors, writers, and photographers who have joined me to re-create a great institution after its journey through tough times. Some are veterans of the dedicated staff who heroically kept the magazine going throughout its economic travails. Others are fresh recruits who bring talents honed by experience not just in the media, new and old, but in the broader world as well. All of us salute Dr. Sidney Harman, who understands that the past is prologue--and who believed enough in NEWSWEEK's brilliant journalistic legacy to invest in its future.

We've all heard the argument that a weekly newsmagazine has no role in today's relentless, 24/7 news culture, in which digital blizzards of information come at us at blinding speed. In fact, I was one of the people making that argument when IAC's chairman, Barry Diller, invited me in 2007 to found a news and opinion website that became THE DAILY BEAST, which, in a new joint venture, has allied with NEWSWEEK as brother and sister in cyberspace and in print. NEWSWEEK is now doubly lucky to have Mr. Diller partner with Dr. Harman in business leadership.

Ironically, it was living in THE DAILY BEAST's fast and furious news cycle for the past two years that revealed to me what a newsmagazine can bring to the table when it's no longer chasing yesterday's story. It's about filling the gaps left when a story has seemingly passed, or resetting the agenda, or coming up with an insight or synthesis that connects the crackling, confusing digital dots. NEWSWEEK's cover story last week--"Brain Freeze"--made the point exactly: a surfeit of information seizes up the ability to process it. What a magazine can offer readers is a path to understanding, a filter to sift out what's important, a pause to learn things that the Web has no time to explain, a tool to go back over the things we think we know but can't make sense of. A magazine allows the reader to play in a different key. …

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A New Newsweek
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