Stamping out Corruption

Manila Bulletin, March 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Stamping out Corruption


MANILA, Philippines - Corruption is a social malady whose ramifications radiate from the highest echelons of power down to the smallest household. Its pervasiveness is, perhaps, its most lethal quality.

Hence, any effort to contain corruption requires broad and constant engagement from all sectors of society.

This is one of the key points taken up during the 4th Global Conference of the Global Organization of Parliamentarians against Corruption (GOPAC) which I attended here in Mexico City this weekend.

GOPAC's first monitoring report emphasizes that having engaged members is primordial in achieving a global plan to combat corruption. This will begin with informed parliamentarians who have the political will to become genuine advocates of both global and national anti-corruption efforts.

The underlying basis for the global fight against corruption is no less than the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC), the first legally binding instrument of its kind.

The Philippine Senate ratified the UNCAC back in November, 2006, which made us the second Southeast Asian country to have done so. As member of the GOPAC's executive board, I was able to help craft some of the language of the UNCAC.

Moreover, we established the Southeast Asian Parliamentarians against Corruption (SEAPAC) in 2005. As a regional chapter, SEAPAC supports the GOPAC's goals of curbing corruption, promoting good governance, and fostering accountability.

However, GOPAC's evaluation shows that much remains to be done toward forming a global plan that would strengthen parliamentary performance in abating corruption and ensuring that the implementation of the UNCAC remains the priority of all countries that signed the convention.

While the foundations have been established, support for the implementation, oversight, and review of the UNCAC in the parliamentary level is still lacking in many countries.

GOPAC, therefore, proposes that strong country chapters should be created to stimulate political and civil cooperation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stamping out Corruption
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.