Gene Form Raises Risk for Diabetes: GIP Variant May Have Aided Survival during Brief Famines

By Saey, Tina Hesman | Science News, March 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Gene Form Raises Risk for Diabetes: GIP Variant May Have Aided Survival during Brief Famines


Saey, Tina Hesman, Science News


A genetic variation that may increase a woman's risk of gestational diabetes is widespread today because it was actually beneficial to early agricultural populations, a new study suggests.

Pregnant women who carry two copies of a low-activity form of the gene GIP have higher blood-glucose levels--a marker of gestational diabetes risk--Sheau Yu Teddy Hsu of Stanford University and colleagues report online February 7 in Diabetes. But when the gene's low-activity version first arose somewhere in Eurasia an estimated 8,100 years ago, that same glucose-boosting quality may have helped women maintain their pregnancies during lean times.

The work is important for characterizing how one form of a gene can shape physiology and how evolution may act on that gene, says Joshua Akey of the University of Washington in Seattle.

Hsu and his colleagues have previously reported evidence that the low-activity version of the GIP gene emerged about 8,100 years ago and rapidly became part of the genetic makeup of Eurasians. Today about half of people of European descent carry this newer form of GIP, while 70 percent or more of Asians do. Only about 5 to 10 percent of Africans have the new form, Hsu says. "It arose very fast, so it must have some dramatic effect on human viability," he says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gene Form Raises Risk for Diabetes: GIP Variant May Have Aided Survival during Brief Famines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.