I Wanted to Be Part of a Force for Good: After 30 Years of Upheaval in the NHS, Is Our Most Precious Public Service Facing a Final Battle for Survival? the Award-Winning Novelist Phil Whitaker, Who Works as a Doctor, Describes His Frustration as Politicians Play with People's Lives

By Whitaker, Phil | New Statesman (1996), February 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

I Wanted to Be Part of a Force for Good: After 30 Years of Upheaval in the NHS, Is Our Most Precious Public Service Facing a Final Battle for Survival? the Award-Winning Novelist Phil Whitaker, Who Works as a Doctor, Describes His Frustration as Politicians Play with People's Lives


Whitaker, Phil, New Statesman (1996)


I have hazy memories of my parents getting their first telephone. It was the late 1960s, and telecommunications was a public service. There was a waiting list but, in time, we got to the head of the queue. An engineer from the General Post Office installed the necessary equipment and we were connected - or at least, connected any time our neighbours weren't using their phone: ours was a "party line ". I don't recall any grumbles about the tortuousness of the process, nor about having to share with the people next door. The sense of wonder at what was now possible must have mitigated any frustration. It was marvellous to be able to speak to relatives and friends from the comfort of home, without having to trudge to the phone box.

The National Health Service was viewed in much the same way. My father developed cancer when I was two years old. He was swiftly cured but irrevocably damaged, and he struggled thereafter with chronic ill-health. His illnesses had knock-on effects on various members of our family, myself included. Between us we saw a lot of the NHS. At the centre of it (to my eyes) was our GP, a good-hearted man with half-moon glasses and a somewhat distant manner. When he needed expert assistance, a referral would be made. Waiting times were sometimes long but were accepted with stoicism: the professionals we eventually saw did their best. Looking back, I recognise the profound comfort in those experiences for my parents, who had grown up knowing what medical care could be like - and its financial implications - before the advent of the NHS. No matter how threatening or scary things got, no matter what time of day or night, this health service was there to help and asked nothing in return.

In the mid-1980s, I entered medical school in Nottingham. Like most aspiring doctors, I knew what I was going to be: a public servant, working extremely long and often antisocial hours, the whole arduous endeavour sustained by a powerful sense of doing something important and worthwhile. I would be joining an unquestionable force for good, grouped under the fluttering blue-and-white standard of the NHS.

But even as I embarked on my training, society was changing under the Thatcher government. The emerging citizen-consumer was increasingly exasperated by the inefficiency of state monopolies; no longer could we tolerate waiting months to have something as commonplace as a phone line installed or repaired. Margaret Thatcher's solution was privatisation and exposure to market forces. British Telecom was sold off in 1984, two years after a licence had been granted to its first competitor, Mercury Communications. British Gas and British Petroleum soon followed. It was only a matter of time before government attention turned to the biggest state monopoly of them all.

I was nearing qualification as a doctor when the then secretary of state for health, Kenneth Clarke, published his 1989 white paper, Working for Patients. The huge, sprawling, multicellular organism of the NHS would be cleaved in two, hospitals becoming providers, wooing and responding to the demands of purchasers in a so-called internal market. Competition, survival of the fittest, would deliver a patient-centred NHS, something even the new breed of health service managers, ushered in by the 1983 Griffiths report, was failing to achieve.

The white paper was greeted with consternation in Nottingham. The city had two general hospitals. Each had the full complement of acute care services and they shared the emergency work, alternating days "on take" for admissions. Specialised departments were located at one or the other site. Co-ordinated by the health authority, they supplied virtually all hospital care for the local population between them, with little unnecessary duplication. Now they were to become independent trusts, no longer co-operating, but competing for each other's business.

The central dilemma with the model was: who, in practice, would the purchasers be?

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I Wanted to Be Part of a Force for Good: After 30 Years of Upheaval in the NHS, Is Our Most Precious Public Service Facing a Final Battle for Survival? the Award-Winning Novelist Phil Whitaker, Who Works as a Doctor, Describes His Frustration as Politicians Play with People's Lives
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