Divorce Tourists 'Will Flock to UK' after Russian's [Pounds Sterling]2.8m Payout

Daily Mail (London), April 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Divorce Tourists 'Will Flock to UK' after Russian's [Pounds Sterling]2.8m Payout


Byline: James Tozer

LONDON'S reputation as 'the divorce capital of the world' was underlined yesterday when a [pounds sterling]2.85million payout was awarded after a shortlived marriage between two wealthy Russians.

High-flying financier Ilya Golubovich, 26, and his fashion worker wife Elena, 27, lived in a [pounds sterling]4million West London house during their big-spending 18 months together.

After the relationship disintegrated, there was a 'race to divorce'. She tried to divorce him in Britain in an attempt to secure a 'big money' settlement for herself and their daughter, now two, while he sought to have the marriage formally ended in Russia, where payouts are far lower.

Mr Golubovich won, but yesterday the Court of Appeal said his wife was entitled to a financial settlement in England, where she still lives. His lawyers had said that the couple's connection to Britain was 'extraordinarily thin' and that to grant the award would 'open the floodgates' to wealthy 'divorce tourists' from around the world. But the court rejected the argument, meaning she is entitled to the [pounds sterling]2.85million lump sum plus cover for her legal costs that the High Court awarded last August.

The couple married in Italy in 2007 and lived at a Kensington home owned by Mr Golubovich's tycoon mother. They spent [pounds sterling]2million in 18 months despite having no earnings in this country, the court heard.

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Divorce Tourists 'Will Flock to UK' after Russian's [Pounds Sterling]2.8m Payout
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