Kelly and David's Pub Dance-Off Led to Love

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), April 13, 2011 | Go to article overview

Kelly and David's Pub Dance-Off Led to Love


The couple: Kelly Davies, 30, a retail sales manager, and David Axon, 30, an air conditioning engineer, both of Ely in Cardiff.

The venue: The couple married last month in a ceremony at St David's Church, Miskin, followed by a reception at the Canada Lodge, Creigiau, Cardiff.

How they met: Kelly met David about four and a half years ago on the dance floor in the Philharmonic bar, St Mary Street, in Cardiff.

She was with her seven workmates for their annual girls-only Christmas night out, while David was out at a festive party.

The pair noticed each other on the dance floor and began to compete in a dance-off.

Kelly said: "We both like to dance when we get out and we were both doing the running man."

Kelly was initially put off David when he told her he played bowls.

She said: "As soon as he told me, I thought, 'My God, only old people play bowls.'" But when Kelly and David made their way to another bar with a clutch of friends, their relationship soon blossomed.

The proposal: David popped the question on Christmas morning two years ago while Kelly was still in bed.

The pair awoke and exchanged festive stockings full of presents.

David then nipped across the hall, saying he needed to get an extra special gift, and returned with a perfume box.

Kelly peered into the box and saw a ring. …

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