What's Really Going on with Gabby Giffords?

By Boyer, Peter J. | Newsweek, April 18, 2011 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

What's Really Going on with Gabby Giffords?


Boyer, Peter J., Newsweek


Byline: Peter J. Boyer

The untold story of the congresswoman's struggle, her husband's faith, and their long, hard road to recovery.

The scheduled launch this month of the space shuttle Endeavour has aroused public interest at a level not seen since NASA's glory days--not because of the mission itself, but because of one potential spectator at the Florida liftoff. Since the Jan. 8 shooting spree in Tucson that killed six people and gravely wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, it has been the goal of her family and doctors that she attend the launch of the Endeavour, commanded by her astronaut husband, Mark Kelly. For Gabby (as she is now known by all), it would be a symbolic moment of triumph. For the country and the world, waiting expectantly and hopefully, it would be the first glimpse of the convalescent who has become America's Congresswoman.

Over these last months, Giffords's difficult path to recovery became that rarest thing: an ongoing good-news story that the public devoured and the media were happy to provide. From the start, details of her actual condition were scant, but her family and staff, colleagues and friends provided enough fresh tidbits to feed the news cycle. The first big news was delivered by the president himself--"Gabby opened her eyes for the first time," Obama announced at a Tucson memorial service, which had the feel of a pep rally--and in the weeks that followed, stunningly good news came forth from Tucson in a steady flow. Giffords touched her husband's face and reached up to give him a neck massage. She spoke her first word, asking for "toast" for breakfast. She was reading get-well cards and scrolling through her iPad. She was able to stand and was even taking a few steps.

Dr. Peter Rhee, the trauma surgeon in Tucson who early on announced that "she has a 101 percent chance of surviving," determined in February that Giffords was ready to be transferred to the Memorial Hermann hospital in Houston. Her new neurosurgeon there said she "looked spectacular," and soon, after she moved to The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR) in Houston, came word that Giffords was conversing and even singing.

One effect of all of this good news was to dampen overt speculation about Giffords's political viability. In March her Washington friends held a political fundraiser for her, fetching about $125,000 in pledges to support her 2012 reelection campaign. The New York Times reported that the Giffords team was actively advancing the prospect of a run for departing Republican Jon Kyl's U.S. Senate seat. One of Giffords's Democratic House colleagues, Rep. Shelley Berkley of Nevada, visited Giffords in Houston and emerged to say that she was eager to return to the House. "She's raising money now," Berkley told a Las Vegas television reporter. "She's running a campaign from the hospital." Earlier this month Daniel Hernandez, the young Giffords intern who rushed to her side after the shooting and accompanied her to the hospital, told the Arizona press that he'd had several telephone conversations with his boss, some of them "lengthy."

In fact, a number of NEWSWEEK interviews--with Giffords staffers and friends who've visited her, doctors in Arizona and Houston who have treated her, and her husband, Mark--suggest that a more measured assessment of her progress is warranted.

Michael McNulty--scion of a prominent Arizona Democratic family (his father, James, was the last Democrat to hold Giffords's seat), a close Giffords friend, and chairman of her last campaign--describes an atmosphere of concern and hope that has led at times to wishful thinking within the Giffords circle. "I don't know how prevalent this is, but I skip straight to this space, which, like some 6-year-old kid that thinks believing in something hard enough will make it come true, believes that she will come back and that she will make a difference in our lives," McNulty says.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What's Really Going on with Gabby Giffords?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.