A Firms' Guide to Direct Payment

The Journal (Newcastle, England), April 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

A Firms' Guide to Direct Payment


A GUIDE for small firms interested in using automated payment methods has been launched to help businesses understand how they can work for them.

Bacs Payment Schemes, the organisation behind direct debit and Bacs direct credit, has teamed up with the Institute of Credit Management (ICM), to develop The Automated Payment Method Guide.

The leaflet is the latest edition of the Managing Cashflow Guide series and comes at a time when British SMEs are collectively owed around pounds 24bn in late payments from customers. The guides, supported by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills and endorsed by Lord Sugar, are designed to help businesses promote best payment practice under the guidelines laid out in the Prompt Payment Code.

They have been downloaded more than 200,000 times since being launched in July 2009.

Bacs spokesman Mike Hutchinson said: "This new Automated Payment Method Guide provides an overview of the various automated payment methods available currently, and even more importantly, the benefits they can bring, such as direct cost savings, better cashflow, and greater reliability. …

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