Give Discourse a Chance: Tina Dupuy Talks Jobs, Palin, and the Man with the Golden Voice

By Tornoe, Rob | Editor & Publisher, March 2011 | Go to article overview
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Give Discourse a Chance: Tina Dupuy Talks Jobs, Palin, and the Man with the Golden Voice


Tornoe, Rob, Editor & Publisher


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AN IRREVERENT YET UNASSUMING HUMORIST, TINA Dupuy, syndicated by eagle Cartoons, has been making waves in newspapers across the country since starting her weekly column in 2010. An obsession with famed San Francisco Chronicle satirist Art Hoppe led Dupuy down the path of journalism, and her experience as a stand-up comedian has infused her strong liberal viewpoints with a sharp sense of humor.

What's the appeal of writing a weekly op-ed column in an age of instant news and analysis?

I think the op-ed page is where discourse still has a chance. It's not barking heads on TV or snarking heads on blogs. It's still a place where you have 700 words to make your case about a current issue. Readers who wouldn't otherwise identify with your political party will still spend the time to hear you out. I get tons of e-mails telling me they like my writing and never agree with me, which makes the op-ed page a place that transcends all the artificial polarization we're led to believe in.

What types of columns usually garner the largest reaction from your readers?

I just did a column about how government workers are being treated like illegal aliens. Their salaries and their pensions are being portrayed as a drain on the economy as opposed to the banksters who caused the crash. The response from people who've faithfully worked in the government, some for 30 years or more, and now feel like President Obama has thrown them under the bus, was heartbreaking.

You had an interesting column following the Arizona shootings calling out Sarah Palin for acting in her own interest. What caused you to take that angle with your column?

I woke up at 4 a.m. and I was angry. I was on Twitter as the shooting was being reported, and Palin was the second or third public figure to release a statement about it.

The worst part about having a public platform is being accountable for everything you say. I have the constitutional right to say it, and you have the constitutional right to challenge me on it. But Palin thinks her free speech means immune speech and nothing she ever says is fair game for criticism. She's been using the language of violent revolution. The people she endorsed during the midterms were, too. Then someone takes a legal gun, literally takes up arms against the government, and she becomes a generic politician giving her condolences passively on her Facebook page.

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