Bride vs. Bride


How does Kate Middleton's wedding stack up against the past 'weddings of the century'? Our guide to the most regal pairings in recent history.

Kate Middleton

Date: April 29, 2011

Nickname: Waity Katie

Groom: Prince William

Dress: The latest speculation holds that the dress will be McQueen

Location: Westminster Abbey

Cake: A fruitcake by Fiona Cairns and a chocolate biscuit cake by McVitie's

Audience: 2 billion (TV, est.)

Ring: Princess Diana's ring

Splurge: The couple will travel in the 1902 state landau built for King Edward VII

Mishap: Looking at you, Harry and Pippa

Personal Touch: Will and Kate will have their first public kiss on a Buckingham Palace balcony

Honeymoon: The couple is rumored to have plans for Corfu and Mustique

Happily Ever After? Here's hoping

Diana Spencer

Date: July 29, 1981

Nickname: The People's Princess

Groom: Prince Charles

Dress: Designed by Emanuel, ivory silk with a 25-foot train and 10,000 pearls

Location: St. Paul's Cathedral

Cake: Five-tier fruitcake, five feet tall, took 14 weeks to make

Audience: 750 million (TV)

Ring: Made by Garrard, 14 diamonds around a sapphire

Splurge: Diana arrived in a 70-year-old glass-top coach

Mishap: During her vows, Diana called Charles by his father's name

Personal Touch: Diana broke tradition, declining to say she would "obey" Charles in her vows

Honeymoon: 11 days cruising on the royal yacht

Happily Ever After? Divorced in 1996

Chelsea Clinton

Date: July 31, 2010

Nickname: Secret Service: "Energy"

Groom: Marc Mezvinsky

Dress: Strapless ivory silk organza by Vera Wang, plus $250,000 in jewelry

Location: Rhinebeck, N.Y.

Cake: Nine-tier vegan cake, four feet tall, weighed 500 lbs.

Audience: Not broadcast

Ring: Emerald-cut diamond, rumored to cost $1 million

Splurge: Reportedly spent $15,000 on Porta-Potties

Mishap: Locals were incensed by the circus. The couple apologized with bottles of wine.

Personal Touch: The couple's first dance was a well-choreographed tango

Honeymoon: Safari in Africa

Happily Ever After? So far, so good

Grace Kelly

Date: April 18-19, 1956

Nickname: Gracie

Groom: Prince Rainier III

Dress: Dress designed by MGM's Helen Rose, took six weeks and 36 seamstresses

Location: St. Nicholas Cathedral, Monaco

Cake: Six-tier cake, cut diamond

Audience: 30 million (TV)

Ring: Cartier 12-carat emerald-cut diamond

Splurge: Kelly's parents paid a $2 million dowry

Mishap: MGM taped the ceremony, and Kelly hated the bright lights

Personal Touch: Kelly gave her bridesmaids jewelry given to her by the shah of Iran, a former suitor

Honeymoon: A cruise aboard Deo Juvante II, the prince's wedding gift to Kelly

Happily Ever After? …

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