Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Crossing the Continent, 1527-1540: The Story of the First African-American Explorer of the American South

By Richmond, Douglas W. | The Journal of Southern History, May 2011 | Go to article overview

Crossing the Continent, 1527-1540: The Story of the First African-American Explorer of the American South


Richmond, Douglas W., The Journal of Southern History


Crossing the Continent, 1527-1540: The Story of the First African-American Explorer of the American South. By Robert Goodwin. (New York: HarperCollins, 2009. Pp. xviii, 414. Paper, $14.99, ISBN 978-0-06114045-7.)

Robert Goodwin describes Esteban, a slave of Andres Dorantes de Carranza, as the first African American in a truly transatlantic sense and emphasizes that Esteban became the most influential of the four immortal explorers who crossed North America between 1528 and 1536. Goodwin does not really achieve the goal of providing a full biography of Esteban, but he has produced a very readable story.

The lack of scholarly apparatus immediately alerts one that the work will not be very convincing. Goodwin uses contemporary Spanish accounts and is familiar with Spanish archives. His bibliography lists many secondary sources, but the narrative is basically undocumented, aside from some feeble endnotes.

There are many occasions when the author's overall knowledge can be disputed. For example, Goodwin makes the strange claim that the Hispanic requerimiento had an Islamic background that Muslims supposedly utilized to "enslave non-Muslims who refused to accept Islam" (p. 31). Furthermore, King Carlos V supposedly "accepted that it was better to enslave Indians than to have Spaniards abandon their colonies" (p. 65). In addition, Goodwin incorrectly describes the Portuguese as itching for war with Spain until a 1411 truce, while overlooking the battle of Aljubarrota and the resulting 1386 Treaty of Windsor with England that subsequently enabled Portugal to initiate overseas expansion. Amazingly, Goodwin also characterizes Prince Henry as a "hotheaded fool" (p.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Crossing the Continent, 1527-1540: The Story of the First African-American Explorer of the American South
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.