Air Force Witchcraft; Political Correctness Casts a Spell on the Armed Forces

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 6, 2011 | Go to article overview

Air Force Witchcraft; Political Correctness Casts a Spell on the Armed Forces


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The U.S. military's success in Pakistan this week proved the importance of maintaining a team focused on accomplishing dangerous missions. Others on the left prefer to look upon the armed forces as a playground to experiment with fringe ideas. Take the Air Force Academy which reportedly held a ceremony on Tuesday to dedicate a pile of rocks in the academy's worship area for followers of Earth-centered religions.

This is a space cadets can use to perform rituals if they happen to be witches, warlocks and tree-worshipers. Overlooking the visitor center, the stone circle is designed for the benefit of a handful of those claiming to be Wiccans or Druids.

In a February 2010 article published on the academy's website, the superintendent explained the pagan altar was required by regulations. The United States Air Force remains neutral regarding religious beliefs and will not officially endorse nor disapprove any faith belief or absence of belief, wrote Lt. Gen. Mike C. Gould. The Earth-centered spirituality group that meets at the Air Force Academy falls within the definition of religion as defined in the United States Air Force Instruction 36-2706.

All of the actual Wiccans and Druids died out hundreds of years ago. The religions of the barbaric tribes of Europe faded away as the Roman conquest brought civilization to the region. Teachings once handed down by oral tradition were entirely forgotten over time. Around the 1950s, fringe leftists enamored by the concept of worshipping the Earth adopted the ancient labels and pretended to follow the old ways. They just left out the inconvenient bits, like human sacrifice. They have likenesses of immense size, the limbs of which are composed of wicker, that they fill with living men, wrote Julius Caesar, describing a Druid ceremony. …

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Air Force Witchcraft; Political Correctness Casts a Spell on the Armed Forces
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