Study Habits for ADHD Children

Manila Bulletin, May 9, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Study Habits for ADHD Children


MANILA, Philippines - Question: My daughter has ADHD. She's the usual hyperactive kid and lacks focus. But I think she is gifted as well. She's really smart and loves to read. Sometimes she gets high grades in her quizzes and exams but sometimes she falls hard. This in turn pulls her final grades down. How can I teach/ train her to be consistent? I know she lacks focus at times but she have proven that she can do the opposite and succeed. Please help. - Worried momThe basic characteristics of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are inattention and hyperactivity. Hence, learning is difficult because it makes it hard for a child to focus. They have a hard time to keep their minds on one task and they easily get bored. Following instructions and learning new concepts are difficult to do. A guide on teaching children with ADHD (http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/osep/index.html) suggests the following effective instructional strategies and practices for these children:Use a three-pronged strategyEvaluate the child' s individual needs and strengths. With the multidisciplinary team, parents discuss academic and behavioral needs using diagnostic assessment and informal classroom observations. These assessments can be used to determine children's strengths and enable instruction to build on their existing abilities Select appropriate instructional practices. Determine which instructional practices will meet the academic and behavioral needs identified for the child that are age appropriate and can gain the attention of the child. Design an IEP (Individualized Education Program) to reflect annual goals and the special education-related services, along with supplementary aids and services necessary for attaining those goals.Useful study skillsBelow are some practices to help improve their organization of homework and other daily assignments:Child's teacher-adviser must regularly review the child's progress through reports and discuss it during meetings to plan and to review program progress and problems.Assignment notebooks must be provided to help organize homework and other seatwork.Color-coded folders will help organize assignments for different academic subjects (e.g., reading, mathematics, social science, and science).Work with a homework partner. Assign the child's parent to help record homework and other seatwork in the assignment notebook and file work sheets and other papers in the proper folders.Clean out desks and book bags. Ask the child to periodically sort through and clean out his or her desk, book bag, and other special places where written assignments are stored.Visual aids as reminders of subject material. Use banners, charts, lists, pie graphs, and diagrams situated throughout the classroom to remind students of the subject material being learned.What parents can do at homeMorning Study Time.

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