Event Focused on Abandoned Babies

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

Event Focused on Abandoned Babies


Event focused on abandoned babies

On behalf of the Breakfast Exchange Club of Gurnee, and the Gurnee Noon Exchange, I would like to thank the entire Gurnee community for its support with our recent project, "Gurnee's Biggest Baby Shower." In special recognition of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, the project helped to bring awareness in our area to the Safe Haven Law and alert parents of the existence of the Illinois Abandoned Newborn Infant Protection law.

This joint effort included shower gift drop-off sites for the community to participate. Our club was blessed to have the cooperation from Warren Township, Gurnee Village Hall, Gurnee Police Department, both Gurnee Fire Departments, Gurnee Park District, Gurnee Ford, First Midwest Bank, Gurnee Huntington Learning Center, and Warren High School District 121 Student Council.Many donations were dropped off because of the publicity our local newspapers provided for us. We would especially like to thank our local newspapers for their coverage and recognizing the importance of this law.

Through your generosity 792 baby items were collected and distributed to Aid For Women of Northern Lake County, a ministry that helps families and infants in crisis.

Increasing awareness of this issue and alerting parents of the existence of the Illinois Abandoned Newborn Infant Protection law is vital. This law provides a parent who might otherwise abandon an infant in an unsafe place, the ability to bring an unharmed newborn 30 days or younger to a staff member at a "safe haven", staffed fire station, police station, hospital, or emergency medical facility. The parents may remain anonymous and will not be prosecuted.

While no infants have been reported left at safe havens in Lake County, 64 babies have been safely relinquished in Illinois since the law's inception in 2001. Unsafe abandonments total 62, with 30 of those infants found dead.

Together we made a difference,

Roberta Pfeiffer

Breakfast Exchange Club of Gurnee Event Co-Chair

'Status quo' politics just divide us

Who could have possibly imagined back in the fall of 2001 that on the day we finally got Osama bin Laden our nation would be unable to unite in the undeniable human emotion of vengeance and feel some joy and closure over getting him. Rather than all being proud of our president and our military, particular kudos to Navy SEAL Team 6 of course, we remain divided and bickering along partisan lines.

A century and a half ago, we spilled blood as the "blue" and the "gray." Now we are divided as the "blue" and the "red" states; and although there is no civil war, no bloodshed, it appears to me our political system is becoming the casualty of this conflict. While we in-fight even during what should be a time of national unity supporting a long-awaited victory, I can only sigh and think of our two parties in Congress that are just fine with the status quo. Time to ask ourselves: Are we?

Dean Fales

Lake Zurich

Derby showed merits of capitalism

I had the pleasure of watching the pre-Kentucky Derby interviews with the different trainers, jockeys and owners. It was a perfect example of capitalism and competition, which is what our nation is all about and what has made us the greatest nation in the history of the world in the shortest period of time.

It was simply wonderful listening to these individuals whether they were jockeys, trainers or owners. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Event Focused on Abandoned Babies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.