Sister Little Syndrome; Serena Williams Is Fixated with Beating Venus. Dannii Minogue Wants to Be More Famous Than Kylie. and We All Know about Pippa. What IS It with Little Sisters? SASHA SLATER (Who's One Herself) Owns Up

Daily Mail (London), May 16, 2011 | Go to article overview

Sister Little Syndrome; Serena Williams Is Fixated with Beating Venus. Dannii Minogue Wants to Be More Famous Than Kylie. and We All Know about Pippa. What IS It with Little Sisters? SASHA SLATER (Who's One Herself) Owns Up


Byline: by Sasha Slater

BY ANY reckoning, this should have been the month when Kate Middleton was enthroned as Britain's unrivalled icon of style.

Yet a fortnight on from that glorious wedding, whose face adorns the cover of no fewer than five celebrity and fashion magazines, from Grazia and Heat to Hello!? It's not Kate's, but Pippa's.

Even at the wedding, it was Kate's head that wore the tiara, but Pippa's bottom that caused an internet sensation.

Then there were the leaked holiday snaps on a boat in Ibiza, taken in 2006, that invited even more praise for Pippa's perfect posterior.

Aside from admiring the Middleton sisters' fabulous figures in their white bikinis, you might have spotted that while Pippa dived in a graceful arc backwards off the yacht, Kate watched from the sidelines, keeping a tight grip on the safety rail.

Whisper it, but it would seem that Her Royal Hotness has stolen more than a little of her older sister's limelight.

In the House of Windsor, you don't have to look far to find another naughty little sister who is sexier, prettier and more redblooded than her staid older sibling. Princess Eugenie, an archetypal younger sister, startled her teachers by frolicking naked through Marlborough College's shrubbery after a pub crawl just before she was due to take her A-levels.

'I am definitely not as polite as Beatrice,' she has admitted of her relationship with her more self-controlled sister. 'At a party, I am much louder while she is far more solicitous.'

Then the trend of the little sister being sexier, more fun-loving and attentionseeking than her elder sibling is one I have watched play out in different scenarios all my life.

I call it Little Sister Syndrome -- an affliction that sees many girls ready to use a big sister's success to gain notoriety themselves.

Just look at X Factor's Dannii Minogue, who is now arguably a bigger name in Britain than her older sister Kylie.

Then there's tennis star Serena Williams, a younger, more aggressive sister who beat her older sibling at her own game.

GEORGIA Jagger has been seriously upstaging her sister Lizzie of late -- so much so that Lizzie was forced to take drastic measures to put her little sister spectacularly back in the shadows by agreeing to a raunchy Playboy shoot.

Nor is Little Sister Syndrome confined to celebrities. At 38, I am two-and-a-half years younger than my sister, Lydia, and just as Serena pursued Venus across the world's centre courts, I tagged after her into journalism.

After university (same university, same course), I was languishing in a dusty warehouse at Christie's auctioneers, cataloguing furniture and watching from the sidelines as she was having a ball at the Cannes Film Festival.

From where I was standing, she was having a lot more fun. Just like Pippa, I wanted a piece of my big sister's action.

And just like Pippa, this found its most unedifying -- and unintentional -- expression at my big sister's wedding.

As a bridesmaid, I was supposed to be reading an affecting poem written by my great-uncle to the assembled crowd of family and friends. I stood up, took one look at the expectant faces and burst into noisy sobs.

The ceremony ground to a halt while I recovered, and the photographer went wild capturing the drama. It wasn't a deliberate ploy and I was mortified, but for ten minutes, her big day was mine, too.

That's the thing with little sisters, though. They just can't help themselves.

That's the thing with little sisters, though. They just can't help themselves.

As Professor Nigel Nicholson, whose book Family Wars deals with conflict within families, observes: 'There is a theory about birth order and rebellion that says eldest children are motivated to conform to what their parents want and fit an orthodox model because they believe that, if they behave, their parents as Professor nigel nicholson, whose book Family Wars deals with conflict within families, observes: 'There is a theory about birth order and rebellion that says eldest children are motivated to conform to what their parents want and fit an orthodox model because they believe that, if they behave, their parents will love them. …

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Sister Little Syndrome; Serena Williams Is Fixated with Beating Venus. Dannii Minogue Wants to Be More Famous Than Kylie. and We All Know about Pippa. What IS It with Little Sisters? SASHA SLATER (Who's One Herself) Owns Up
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