Don't Dis My Sequel!

By Setoodeh, Ramin | Newsweek, May 30, 2011 | Go to article overview

Don't Dis My Sequel!


Setoodeh, Ramin, Newsweek


Byline: Ramin Setoodeh

We ask some of the summer's biggest celebrities to defend their newest retreads.

Emma Watson

Harry Potter 8

This is the best, because it's the finale. We've put our heart and soul, blood and guts--and tears!--into it.

The special effects are mind-blowing. I don't know what happened: are we using a different team, or do we have more money?

You see a different side of Hermione. She's more like Lara Croft.

The pace is absolutely relentless. It's like a two-hour roller-coaster ride.

We have a dragon.

Geoffrey Rush

Pirates of the Caribbean 4

The top of the list? I can say it in one word: mermaids.

We have the first female pirate who is capable of going mano a mano with Jack Sparrow in the shape of Penelope Cruz.

Between Pirates 3 and 4 my character loses a limb. But I have a crutch, and it becomes a potent weapon.

Jerry Bruckheimer is so confident from the early reactions. There's definitely a Pirates 5 in development.

Jessica Alba

Spy Kids 4

My uniform is spandex and leather. The key is, you have to do the fighting without ripping your outfit.

There's a special surprise with the 3-D. …

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