Eat Your Heart out, Dave! You Don't Have to Live at No 10 to Have Two Kitchens

Daily Mail (London), May 17, 2011 | Go to article overview

Eat Your Heart out, Dave! You Don't Have to Live at No 10 to Have Two Kitchens


Byline: by Anne Shooter

MY HOUSE is full of admiring guests standing in my beige wood kitchen, sipping Prosecco and nibbling on a selection of nuts and olives in little bowls on my huge, oaktopped island.

The kitchen is spotless, the white granite counters clear -- save for my Dualit toaster and Nespresso coffee machine -- and there's a series of impressed 'ooohs!' as I remove my warm tomato tarts from the oven and drizzle them with basil oil.

'How can your kitchen be so tidy after all the cooking you must have done today?' asks one of my friends. I smile serenely, revelling in my Stepford Wife impression.

Then, when everyone turns back to their conversations, I whip away the baking tray and open the door to the adjoining room -- effectively my second, 'messy' kitchen -- where I add it to the huge pile of washing-up in the sink.

but couldn't be farther in terms of chaos. There are dirty saucepans and bowls, empty bottles and cans, an overflowing box of old newspapers, baskets full of ironing, bags of pet food ... it's nothing short of a tip!

It might sound extravagant to have two kitchens, but it seems to have become something of a middle-class trend. And even the Prime Minister is part of it. Move over Two Jags Prescott. Now we have Two Kitchens Cameron.

David and Samantha have had a second kitchen fitted in their flat above No11 Downing Street (which they use because it's bigger than the family accommodation at No10). We are told it is large and modern, and, rather than replacing the 1970s kitchen already there, it has been built in addition to it.

The first question on many lips must have been: 'But why?' The truth is, because they can.

Cherie Blair has admitted that when she saw the kitchen at No11, her heart sank; it was so awful and outdated.

But at the time the Blairs moved in, they couldn't afford to splash out. That's not a problem for the supremely well-off Camerons.

However much they want us to think they are just like us ordinary folk, taking easyJet flights and staying in three-star hotels while wearing clothes from M&S and Gap, the fact is they are properly stinking rich. And, of course, they have paid for the new kitchen themselves.

One thing we know, it won't be from B&Q. It'll be a gorgeous, trendy, designer job like they had in Notting Hill; the kind that costs at least [pounds sterling]50,000 or so.

And, depending on what happens in the next election, they might get only three or four years' use out of it. Then they'll have to give it over to the new owners. how many of us could afford to do that? granite dishes, oak There warming So why didn't they simply replace the pokey old kitchen? Presumably for the same reasons I decided to have two.

My workaday kitchen contains a washing machine and tumble dryer, a second fridge and loads of cupboards storing everything from oversized casserole dishes to Tupperware pots, cooling racks and jam-making equipment. double for In the civilised separate preparing room we're walls This domestic the then, It is purely practical, so was kitted out in the cheapest units we could find, with a grey tiled floor and a nasty work surface, albeit one you would never notice as it is usually covered with washing baskets, school swimming bags, the microwave and, currently, a tray of meringues and one of chocolate brownies left over from a dinner party on Saturday night. …

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