Jeremy Seeks out Those Places Where Even Angels Fear to Tread; CARDIFF-BORN Jeremy Bowen Has Reported for the BBC from Conflicts across the World, Yet the Uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East Have Been Some of the Most Astonishing Events He Has Covered. Julia McWatt Reports

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 19, 2011 | Go to article overview

Jeremy Seeks out Those Places Where Even Angels Fear to Tread; CARDIFF-BORN Jeremy Bowen Has Reported for the BBC from Conflicts across the World, Yet the Uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East Have Been Some of the Most Astonishing Events He Has Covered. Julia McWatt Reports


Byline: Julia McWatt

* EREMY Bowen has been reporting from parts of the world most tourists would do their utmost to avoid for most of his career.

His job has taken him to more than 70 countries, conflicts in the Gulf, El Salvador, Lebanon, the West Bank, Afghanistan, Croatia, Bosnia, Chechnya, Somalia and Rwanda.

But he says the past few months, which have seen major changes in the political landscape of countries including Egypt and Tunisia, alongside uprisings in Libya and Syria, have been some of the most interesting of his career.

Speaking from the Egyptian capital Cairo last week, from where he has been covering the popular uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, Mr Bowen said he had been trying to get into Syria, which has refused to issue visas to journalists.

His stories are legion, covering everything from the Rwandan refugee crisis to the first Gulf War.

He said: "I remember during the first Gulf War in 1991 the BBC correspondents had to wear dog collars with information including our blood group on them.

"We had to go out to a pet shop on Uxbridge Road and instead of buying collars that said Rover or something we had to write our names and blood groups on them. It was very strange.

"On another one of our trips to Gaza we had to sign something to say we knew there was a risk of kidnap but would have no consular support. That was a bit worrying."

He said journalists have been fascinated by the different dynamics in the countries whose leaders had been overthrown, Tunisia and Egypt, and those where rulers are holding on - which include Syria, Libya and Bahrain.

The events began in Tunisia in December, 2010, which resulted in the ousting of long-time President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and inspired the Egyptian revolution in January, 2011, which saw President Hosni Mubarak step down after 30 years in power.

Yet in Syria, President Bashar al-Assad yesterday said the country was overcoming the crisis, which has seen security forces take hold of towns and kill protesters.

The authorities have blamed most of the violence on criminal gangs, while those activists able to communicate with the West say they have been targeted as part of a crackdown on the dissent.

Mr Bowen said: "It started off with Tunisia and then Egypt and then moved simultaneously in Yemen and Libya and then after that it was Syria.

"We have already seen some of the political consequences of what's been happening, but this will change the Middle East permanently. It's a whole new era. One senior UN figure said to me that there has been more history in the last three months than we have seen in the last 30 years.

"For some years now the Middle East has been still, so there are all kinds of things that can happen in terms of the way things might move.

"Things have not moved for such a long time and for many people it has been quite frustrating.

" I do not think that anyone could have foreseen what has happened this year. I have spoken to people who were involved in the early demonstrations in Egypt and I spoke to one who was in the first demonstration that kicked it all off.

"They all told me that they thought they would be arrested within 10 minutes. They thought they would be thrown into the back of a police van.

"We thought the protesters would do their best but it was an incredibly strong police state and they would crush them. But for various reasons they did not."

He said that there had been a lot of widespread discussion and analysis as to why the protesters were successful in overthrowing the regime in some of the countries but in others, the ruling leaders have managed to crush dissidents, usually killing or using brute force against them.

He said: "One of the interesting debating points now is why things worked in Tunisia and Egypt in overthrowing the regime but why it is not working in Libya and Syria? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Jeremy Seeks out Those Places Where Even Angels Fear to Tread; CARDIFF-BORN Jeremy Bowen Has Reported for the BBC from Conflicts across the World, Yet the Uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East Have Been Some of the Most Astonishing Events He Has Covered. Julia McWatt Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.