Cultivating Creativity within Financial Constraints: Three Success Stories Illustrate Best Practices of Community College Global Education

By Dean, Sherry | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, May 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Cultivating Creativity within Financial Constraints: Three Success Stories Illustrate Best Practices of Community College Global Education


Dean, Sherry, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


A growing number of community colleges have made global education a key component of their college mission. Community colleges are preparing students to function and compete in a global context. They are recruiting international students, leading international exchanges and partnerships and exporting the two-year college model overseas.

However, global education is often among the first initiatives to be questioned or cut in difficult financial times. As a result, creativity must be cultivated within the constraint of leaner operating budgets in order not to lose ground. Many community college leaders are doing just that. Three success stories from North Carolina and Texas pave the way:

North Carolina: The North Carolina Global Learner Consortium was created in 2001 to facilitate global education resource sharing among the 58 institutions in the state's community college system and to create external partnerships. One outcome of the consortium is Durham Technical College's new Center for Global Learning, which serves a burgeoning international student population (656 students from 95 countries) and responds to local workforce training needs. The CGL is the first of its kind in the NCCC System. It centralizes all global education initiatives and international student services, including ESL courses, world languages, translation programs and study abroad for faculty and students. In its most recent collaboration with Duke University, DTC faculty participated in an intensive, short-term professional development seminar in the Dominican Republic.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Texas: The Houston Community College System serves more than 6,600 international students, the largest international student population of any community college in the nation. HCC's Office of International Initiatives coordinates a robust menu of international student services, global curriculum and exchange programs while fostering international partnerships.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

HCC also aggressively markets the community college model overseas, with no cost to local taxpayers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cultivating Creativity within Financial Constraints: Three Success Stories Illustrate Best Practices of Community College Global Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.