Complaint Claims Lanier Is Harsher on Male Cops; EEOC Is Told of Penalty 'Pattern'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 31, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Complaint Claims Lanier Is Harsher on Male Cops; EEOC Is Told of Penalty 'Pattern'


Byline: Jeffrey Anderson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A complaint before the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by four veteran Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) officials accuses Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier of a disturbing pattern of discriminatory conduct in handing down harsher discipline for male officers than female officers.

Cmdr. Willie Dandridge, Cmdr. Hilton Burton, Capt. Victor Brito and Capt. Kevin Anderson identify 10 male officers disciplined and demoted by Chief Lanier and eight female officers who avoided a similar fate, and claim that when allegations of misconduct swirled within the command staff, if the command official was a woman, she was never demoted and rarely disciplined.

The discrimination challenge arises as Chief Lanier grapples with what veteran officers and union and legal representatives say is a department plagued by morale problems stemming from what is viewed as her heavy-handed and uneven approach to discipline.

Of particular concern, according to separate discipline cases pending before the D.C. Court of Appeals, is Chief Lanier's repeated use of a statute that gives her the right to demote commanders to the lower rank of inspector or captain without cause or a hearing. Critics say the statute has been overused and that the chief has used the threat of no-cause demotions to influence the rulings of officials who serve on police disciplinary panels, known as trial boards.

In an emailed statement, Chief Lanier said discipline under her predecessor, Charles H. Ramsey, was too severe.

She said she has strived to differentiate between inadvertent mistakes and firing offenses but won't hesitate to replace members of her department who fail to perform to acceptable levels.

We still make sure that our officers and officials are accountable, she wrote.

Three of the four complainants before the EEOC served on trial boards together and caught Chief Lanier's eye when they repeatedly ruled that discipline recommended by her subordinates was not substantiated by the facts or the evidence. In a notice of a potential whistleblower claim, Mr. Brito said that Chief Lanier called on Oct. 15, 2009, and instructed him to look at these matters differently in the future before abruptly hanging up the phone.

Mr. Brito, a 22-year decorated official with no prior record of discipline, was later removed as director of the MPD's disciplinary branch and demoted from inspector to captain after Chief Lanier disagreed with his decision not to discipline an officer accused of adultery and after a lieutenant under his command released a copy of the investigative file in the case to the officer that included an email identifying the complaining witness.

The witness was Chief Lanier's Facebook friend and Mayor Vincent C. Gray's campaign consultant turned political appointee Cherita Whiting, who refers to the chief as Kathy or Kat.

Mr. Dandridge, also a 22-year veteran who served with Mr. Brito on numerous trial boards, was demoted by Chief Lanier after achieving the rank of assistant chief. The Chief told me that she was demoting me to put her own people in place, 'people she could trust,'" states the EEOC complaint.

Like Mr. Brito, Mr. Dandridge had a previous run-in with Chief Lanier. In 2007, after being disciplined for allegedly failing to give an order to reduce a backlog of calls for service in the 6th District, Mr. Dandridge said in his appeal that internal affairs investigators ignored tainted evidence and the misconduct of others because there was a predetermination that Assistant Chief Dandridge would be held responsible for the incident regardless of the evidence.

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Complaint Claims Lanier Is Harsher on Male Cops; EEOC Is Told of Penalty 'Pattern'
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