Quality Control of Welfare Programs

By Rolph, John E. | Journal of the American Statistical Association, September 1990 | Go to article overview

Quality Control of Welfare Programs


Rolph, John E., Journal of the American Statistical Association


EDITOR

John E. Rolph, The RAND Corporation

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

James S. Hodges, The RAND Corporation

Roderick J. A. Little, University of California at Los Angeles

Robert L. Obenchain, Glaxo Inc.

This is the fifth special section to appear in JASA and the first one in the new review section format. This special section on quality control of welfare programs addresses a public policy problem with a substantial statistical content. In contrast, special sections in the earlier format were on general topics (survey research methods, statistical graphics, computational statistics, and biopharmaceutical statistics).

ISSUES

The potential stakes in quality control (QC) of federal-state family assistance programs are large. In 1987, $49 billion of federal monies went to the aid of families with dependent children, food stamp, and Medicaid programs, with tens of millions of people affected. The historical QC systems in these welfare programs have engendered controversy, litigation, and Congressional interest. This controversy spawned a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Panel Study with substantial statistical content because many of the issues and the policy choices hinge on the answers to statistical questions. With these ingredients, QC in welfare programs raises issues that should spark the interest of the statistical community. JASA readers will be exposed here to the views of several major contributors to this policy debate.

The first question in the policy debate about QC systems in family assistance programs is whether their historical focus on measuring the accuracy of state decisions on eligibility and benefit levels is too narrow. Should such systems target more comprehensive performance measures? Should they be broadened into full-scale quality improvement programs? Specific statistical questions that have been raised about the historical QC systems include the choice between design-based and model-based inference, measurement issues, and how error rate estimates should be used to assess financial penalties. Some proponents of change suggest using alternative statistical methods, including Bayes and empirical Bayes estimators. Statisticians interested in applications will find a variety of challenging issues to grapple with.

SPECIAL SECTION CONTENTS

Kramer's article opens the section by succinctly describing the QC systems for the federal-state family assistance programs, the context for the debate over QC in welfare programs, and the competing views on the major issues. Although the other articles can be understood without reading the Kramer article, the uninitiated reader will benefit by reading it first.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Quality Control of Welfare Programs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.