Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare

By Hernandez, S. Robert | Inquiry, Winter 2009 | Go to article overview

Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare


Hernandez, S. Robert, Inquiry


Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare. By Anthony R. Kovner, David J. Fine, and Richard D'Aquila. Chicago: Health Administration Press. 2009. 298 pp. $79 (paper).

Evidence-based practice has received increased attention in the health care sector over the past 20 years. Much of the impetus for this movement results from the value that medicine has associated with seeking a better understanding of outcome probabilities with treatments for selected disease processes. While there has been some criticism of evidence-based medicine, the principles for this approach have been fairly widely accepted in medical care delivery. This concept also has been touted for application in public health. Ross Brownson and colleagues (Evidence-Bused Public Health, New York: Oxford University Press, 2003) extended the value of applying scientific evidence in making management decisions, policy development, and program implementation to public health issues. Their approach focused on using evidence to address population health topics and relate public sector issues in an attempt to achieve maximum return from public health expenditures.

More recent discussions have focused on extending evidence-based practice to management. In her 2005 presidential address to the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Denise Rousseau suggested that management had not benefited from organizational research and that the "research-practice gap'" needs to be closed if managers are to take action and base decisions on the best available evidence. One of her recommendations for closing this gap was for the development of models of evidence-based practice to be used as a guide for practitioners. Another suggestion was for the development of collaboration among managers, researchers, and educators to change the manner in which we educate students in professional schools.

Anthony Kovner and his colleagues' recent work is an important step toward addressing the issues raised by Rousseau. Their work has potential for advancing evidence-based practice in health care management. The text begins with research findings suggesting that health care executives make little use of evidence in decision making and that executives perceive existing evidence is inadequate to support decision making. The book continues with the authors sharing their experiences in the use of evidence in health care management. Kovner discusses the Montefiore Medical Center experience in New York. David Fine and Emily Garrison report on efforts to transform the culture at St. Luke's Episcopal Health System in Houston through the use of metrics and information gathering to support decisions. Richard D. Aquila shares his experience at Yale-New Haven Hospital in improving hospital performance through a coordinated use of evidence-based analysis and decision making in hospital operations. These three examples highlight the value that a health care organization can derive from using evidence, and they provide a strong counter argument to the reported conventional wisdom that adequate information is not available for health care management use.

The next section of the text provides a detailed discussion of evidence-based management and provides examples of the types of questions that might be addressed with this approach. The book offers a six-step approach for developing actionable evidence. These steps include: 1) framing the question behind the decision; 2) finding sources of information: 3) assessing the accuracy of the information; 4) assessing the applicability of information; 5) assessing the action ability of information; and 6) determining whether the information is adequate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.