Born under Communism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 13, 2011 | Go to article overview

Born under Communism


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

BORN UNDER COMMUNISM

Standing by a statue dedicated to freedom, Aldona Wos remembered a childhood under communism and the inspiration of her heroic father, who saved Jews and survived a Nazi concentration camp.

Having lived under communism, I know firsthand the devastation that the communist regimes have imposed on millions of people, she said last week at the fourth anniversary of the dedication of the Goddess of Democracy on Capitol Hill.

Dr. Wos grew up in Poland, earned a medical degree from the Warsaw Medical Academy and served as the U.S. ambassador to Estonia after her parents resettled in the United States.

Her father, Paul Zenon Wos, was a Polish soldier at the outbreak of World War II, when the Nazis invaded from the west, the Soviets from the east. He escaped from the Red Army after the Soviet massacre of 22,000 Polish officers in the Katyn forest in 1940 and made his way back to Warsaw, where he later saved Jews from the Nazis.

Mr. Wos fought in the failed Warsaw Uprising four years later and spent the rest of the war in a concentration camp.

My parents endured years of communist rule before giving up everything in their native country to bring me to a land that provided fundamental freedom and opportunity, Dr. Wos said.

Although communism began to collapse in Europe 22 years ago, Dr. Wos noted that one-quarter of the world's population still lives under the repressive system in countries like China, Cuba, North Korea and Vietnam.

Communism is not a thing of the past, she said. It is our obligation to teach future generations that truth - that communist ideology is responsible for crimes against humanity.

Paula Dobriansky, a former under secretary of state for democracy and global affairs, explained that the statue to freedom is a replica of the one Chinese students erected in Tiananmen Square in 1989 before Chinese troops crushed the pro-democracy movement.

As we gather here today, she said, we look to a future that will leave the forces of evil in our wake. …

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