Social Justice Goes beyond Economics

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 5, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Social Justice Goes beyond Economics


Social justice goes beyond economics

The aims of social justice are fairly simple to understand. Social justice promotes a society based on the principles of fairness and human rights, often by defending the dignity of every human being regardless of socioeconomic status. What social justice does not do is demand that everyone earn the same income regardless of their abilities. What it does do is demand that everyone be treated with the same moral and legal consideration regardless of their income. While some advocates of social justice do promote socioeconomic redistribution, it's inaccurate to say that the idea itself inherently demands it.

What people like Mr. Skeet (Fence Post, March 23) fail to realize is that the idea that saying social justice is primarily a matter of economics is a fallacious straw man. Earning more money than someone else does not entitle someone to disregard the moral value of another human being; this is as far as social justice goes into economics, and anything beyond that is an addition to the underlying idea.

Next time you feel yourself inclined to argue against social justice, remember that the equality of opportunity Americans pat themselves on the back for having, and that Mr. Skeet hides behind when he praises the entrepreneur at the expense of the gamer, is based on the principle of social justice. The Constitution, ensuring that every individual receives equal treatment under the law, is based on the principle of social justice. Even the idea that individuals have a right to keep what they earn is based on the principle of social justice. So rather than rally against any perceived threat to your pocketbook, I encourage people like Mr. Skeet to actually learn what it is you're arguing against before saying social justice is disturbing or harmful.

Christopher Burrell

Barrington

Don't say regional offices not efficient

Your editorial of March 27, "An education in change management," lacks logic and substance.

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