Family Drama; Barbara Rafferty Hits Stage with Husband and Son

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), May 29, 2011 | Go to article overview

Family Drama; Barbara Rafferty Hits Stage with Husband and Son


Byline: MARION SCOTT

RIVER CITY star Barbara Rafferty will keep it in the family by taking to the stage alongside her real-life husband in a play about a warring couple.

Sparks will fly when Barbara - who played soap crimper Shirley Henderson - goes head-to-head with Sean Scanlan.

And composing the music for the Daniel Boyle play Lark, Clark And The Puppet Hand is Barbara's son Bob Rafferty, of rock band El Dog.

Barbara, best known as Ella Cotter in Rab C. Nesbitt, said: "It's absolutely wonderful to be working with them both.

"Sean and I have played a couple before. He was Ella's love interest Shug in the last Rab C. series, flirting behind Jamesie's back.

"We first acted together in 1984 in a play about Subbuteo of all things.

"Of course we were star-crossed lovers in Love Lies Bleeding in 1998 and ended up falling in love, just like our characters in the play.

"But this time we're a couple at war and the sparks really fly between us.

"And Bob has come up with a particularly wonderful song for us to sing together."

Sean said: "Barbara plays all these feisty female roles, yet she's the sweetest woman in the world in real life.

"This latest character is absolutely nothing like her, of course.

"But we're really enjoying both roles, especially as it allows us to work with Bob.

"Barbara and I appeared on Daniel Boyle's Hamish Macbeth and this new play of his has the same quirky feel to it.

"I think audiences will enjoy it and we get to work alongside our great friend Frank Gallagher, who acts as a catalyst between the sparring couple."

Set in the late 1950s, fate brings Lark and Clark together for the last time at the down-at-heel Criterion Club.

They have been a successful celebrity couple for decades but, after an acrimonious split, they have not seen each other for four years.

Barbara, 60, said: "They've made it all the way to the London Palladium and now they're at each other's throats.

"I do seem to get cast in the role of a nippy woman - I guess it's the inner me who is too frightened to come out except on stage."

Glasgow-born Sean, 61, who is best known for appearances in Two Thousand Acres Of Sky, Monarch Of The Glen, Coronation Street and movies such as Prisoner Of Honour and Phantom Of The Opera, said: "Clark is pretty bitter about the way things have worked out. There's a lot of water under the bridge between this couple."

Mum-of-three Barbara added: "We don't want to give away the ending, suffice to say there are quite a few twists and turns."

Sean and Barbara have been busy rehearsing Lark and Clark's signature tune The Couple You Love To Love.

plays Her son Bob, 31, the lead vocalist in El Dog, said: "I think people are going to be blown away by mum and Sean's performance - they sound brilliant.

females "I immersed myself in 1950s music before finally coming up with a score for the play. is "The particular song for Lark and Clark has a lot of references to their situation and a Harry Belafonte feel to it.

"Growing up in our house, we were surrounded by music so it's no surprise we've all ended up doing what we do."

Barbara said: "Bob's done a fantastic job on it - and I know a mum would say that.

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