Dalglish Still Has a Great Eye for a Player Insists Carter; Jimmy Carter Has Often Been Viewed as a Blot on Kenny Dalglish's Managerial Copybook but Two Decades after He Arrived at Anfield, the Likeable Londoner Tells Ben Thornley How He Is Backing the Scot to Revive Liverpool's Fortunes

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), June 17, 2011 | Go to article overview

Dalglish Still Has a Great Eye for a Player Insists Carter; Jimmy Carter Has Often Been Viewed as a Blot on Kenny Dalglish's Managerial Copybook but Two Decades after He Arrived at Anfield, the Likeable Londoner Tells Ben Thornley How He Is Backing the Scot to Revive Liverpool's Fortunes


Byline: Ben Thornley

HISTORY may not remember his move to Liverpool kindly, but Jimmy Carter has a fond keepsake of his short spell at Anfield.

For two decades he has endured the jibes of Liverpool supporters and the harsh words of critics who gave him the label of Kenny Dalglish's poorest signing and an indication the Scot was struggling with the pressure which prompted his resignation in 1991.

"People have long memories," says the 45-year-old.

Yet many forget that Carter - who has backed Dalglish's eye for a player, now and 20 years ago - made a blistering start to his Liverpool career. Days after completing his pounds 750,000 move from Milwall in the January of 1991, he made an impressive debut in a 0-0 draw at Aston Villa before claiming the man-of-the-match Champagne in his next outing against Wimbledon.

The unopened bottle still takes pride of place in his house.

"I signed on the Wednesday or Thursday and went straight into the side playing in front of 52,000 people at Villa Park," says Carter, who was once hauled off by Graeme Souness shortly after being brought on from the bench.

"We drew 0-0 but we dominated and deserved three points.

"In the next game against Wimbledon I was awarded the man-of-the-match award. I still have the bottle of champagne, which I'll be showing to the grandkids."

Only a month after recruiting the pacy winger, Dalglish quit Liverpool because of stress following a turbulent two years.

The loss of his biggest backer shook the confidence of Carter who failed to recapture his early Anfield for m.

And the arrival of Souness as Dalglish's long-term successor ended his Liverpool career after just five games and two starts.

He was sold to Arsenal for pounds 500,000 in October 1991 but never fulfilled the promise he had shown at Milwall.

"When I signed it was a great joy to be asked to play for Liverpool. It was a great honour for me to wear the red shirt," says Carter, who had terrorised the Reds defence in Liverpool's 2-1 win at The Den in the 1989/90 season.

"Kenny signed me in the January of 1991 and by February he was gone. You can imagine from my point of view I was totally deflated.

"When King Kenny comes in for you, it is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

"Graeme Souness came in and said straightaway that I wasn't going to be for him and within 10 months I'd gone.

"I wanted to stay but I wasn't going to take a stance, there was no use hanging on. signings Jamie "It knocked my confidence big time. I don't think I ever recovered from it."

was Kenny last signing spell in charge LIverpool, from January 1991 Despite the personal pain caused by his rejection, his biggest regret is leaving a blemish on Dalglish's transfer record. …

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Dalglish Still Has a Great Eye for a Player Insists Carter; Jimmy Carter Has Often Been Viewed as a Blot on Kenny Dalglish's Managerial Copybook but Two Decades after He Arrived at Anfield, the Likeable Londoner Tells Ben Thornley How He Is Backing the Scot to Revive Liverpool's Fortunes
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