Ipswich Still Loves You Kevin; Voters Overwhelmingly Prefer Rudd to Gillard in Prime Minister Poll

The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia), June 22, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Ipswich Still Loves You Kevin; Voters Overwhelmingly Prefer Rudd to Gillard in Prime Minister Poll


Byline: Rebecca Lynch

SEVEN out of 10 Ipswich voters would prefer Kevin Rudd to Julia Gillard as Prime Minister.

Two days before Rudd's self-dubbed C[pounds sterling]Assassination DayC[yen] anniversary, a clear majority of Ipswich voters believe that his superior leadership qualities, hardworking ethic, upfront nature and Co for some Co his Queensland origins, would make him a better Prime Minister than Gillard.

Yesterday's street poll by The Queensland Times found that 71 out of 100 ordinary Ipswich voters would like to see Kevin Rudd reinstated as Prime Minister.

The result came a day after Queensland MPs asserted that Julia Gillard would not be able to win in Queensland unless she capitalised on Rudd's popularity.

A senior Queensland ALP figure said that Gillard and Rudd would have to develop a much better working relationship, in order for Gillard to capitalise on her predecessor's popularity.

C[pounds sterling]The public aren't fooled. This is just overshadowing everything,C[yen] the source said of the tense relationship.

Some MPs have also suggested that Gillard give Rudd a bigger role in promoting the Labor brand in his home state.

With pro-Rudd feelings still strong around town, and only 29% of locals preferring Gillard to Rudd, this could be Gillard's only chance to win over Ipswich voters.

MP for Blair, Shayne Neumann, said that Mr Rudd was a political asset for Labor in Queensland.

Dinmore resident John Clarke, 60, said he would prefer Kevin Rudd, but was obligated to vote for Gillard as head of the Labor Party.

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