True Blood's Identity Crisis

By Lacob, Jace | Newsweek, June 27, 2011 | Go to article overview

True Blood's Identity Crisis


Lacob, Jace, Newsweek


Byline: Jace Lacob

As the hit drama rises again, its creator balances a love story with the supernatural.

The 13 million fans obsessed with True Blood can finally breathe a sigh of relief. The existential soap opera, which takes place in the fictional town of Bon Temps, La., home to telepathic waitress Sookie Stackhouse (Anna Paquin) and a host of vampires, is making a splashy--and sexy--summer return. Last season on the blood-soaked drama, a news anchor was eviscerated on live television and Sookie vanished with her faerie godmother. Yet the appeal of the show lies in the fact that it's not all about neck-biting and werewolves.

"I always choose to look, as much as one can, at the supernatural not being something that exists outside of nature, but a deeper, fundamental heart of nature that perhaps humans -- have lost touch with," says executive producer Alan Ball. "It's a more primal thing than perhaps we are attuned to in our modern, self-aware way of life."

True Blood works as a metaphor for oppressed minorities in America, and examines the onus of humanity and moral dilemmas. The key, says Ball, is to make sure everyone has legitimate emotional concerns. …

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