Globalisation and Africa: The African Hair Issue Is Deep. and I Get Upset When Africans Do Not Seem to Realise It. Black Women Worldwide Are Not Just Weaving for a Bit of Fun. They Are Wearing Weaves Because That Is Their Self-Image-And All This Thanks to So-Called Globalisation

By Djanie, Akua | New African, June 2011 | Go to article overview

Globalisation and Africa: The African Hair Issue Is Deep. and I Get Upset When Africans Do Not Seem to Realise It. Black Women Worldwide Are Not Just Weaving for a Bit of Fun. They Are Wearing Weaves Because That Is Their Self-Image-And All This Thanks to So-Called Globalisation


Djanie, Akua, New African


Globalisation. What exactly does it mean? According to the Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary, globalisation is "the fact that different cultures and economic systems around the world are becoming connected and similar to each other because of the influence of large multinational companies and of improved communication." The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, however, defines globalisation as when "social and cultural influences, gradually become similar in all parts of the world." Notice--"becoming connected and similar" and "become similar".

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

I agree the world is becoming more connected. But similar? Umm, I don't see it. What I see is the dumbing down and devaluing of other cultures, and the shunning of age-old cultural traditions that were passed on from generation to generation. Globalisation on the cultural level is not about the different cultures of the world becoming similar. It looks more like brainwashing for everybody to become the same. And yes, there are many cultures in the world, but I don't see the West shutting down for the Chinese New Year, although we all shut down for New Year as marked in the Christian calendar. For this piece, however, I am focusing only on Africa.

To emphasise my point, let me quote from the responses of two readers (NA, April 2011) to my reflections about the loss of African culture (NA, Feb 2011). The first reader, Stephan Brenner, wrote in from Ghana that globalisation is "providing a look beyond one's own traditional heritage, that should allow anyone to embrace other cultures and traditions openly in order to decide which pieces of a foreign culture are appealing or even enriching."

If this is a true definition of globalisation, than we have no problems. I have no issue with Africans embracing other cultures and traditions and taking on board what they find "appealing or enriching", as long as it does not devalue authentic African ways of life. Seriously, if Africans want to dance salsa all day, I have no problems with that. But when we start dancing salsa all day and refuse to see the beauty in African dance, that is where I have serious issues. Right now in Ghana, the youth are all about salsa. But ask the same young people to go to African dance sessions and they will turn their noses up at you. This is a problem because if all African youth across the 53 countries of the continent embraced foreign dances to the detriment of their own dances, the future of African dance would just be stories of what once was.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The second reader, Mikhalia Cupido, from Rwanda, mentioned the fact that I talked about Chinese girls in Ghana having their hair braided. She suggested that if they can do this, then it is acceptable for African women to take such an approach. Look, Chinese girls on holiday in Ghana deciding to braid their hair for a bit of fun can hardly be compared to what is going on in the minds of black women worldwide--the denial of their true self. Everywhere in the world, black women are wearing false hair as their daily look. This is their daily self-image. Black women are not wearing false hair as a bit of fun now and again. They are weaving false hair over their natural hair as their natural identity. Think about it. Really. Stop for one moment and really think about it. Black women worldwide cornrow their natural hair into a beautiful style, then with the aid of glue or a needle and thread, they add onto their natural hair the hair of a woman, dead or alive, from India, Brazil, Thailand and the like. Then and only then do they feel complete (well, some go as far as adding plastic nails and eyelashes!).

Do you not find something wrong with this picture? Chinese women worldwide are not taking on board African hairstyles as part of their daily appearance. Have you seen Chinese women, en masse in China, or the UK or France or anywhere else in the world, rocking Afros, braids, locks, nubian bumps, etc, as their daily image of themselves? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Globalisation and Africa: The African Hair Issue Is Deep. and I Get Upset When Africans Do Not Seem to Realise It. Black Women Worldwide Are Not Just Weaving for a Bit of Fun. They Are Wearing Weaves Because That Is Their Self-Image-And All This Thanks to So-Called Globalisation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.