Storm Clouds Ahead for More Than 1 Child

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 6, 2011 | Go to article overview

Storm Clouds Ahead for More Than 1 Child


Byline: Marybeth Hicks, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

I n May, a Toronto couple made international news when they revealed what they're not revealing: the gender of their baby, Storm.

Parents Kathy Witterick and David Stocker claim they want their baby to grow up free of the constraints gender identification implies.

That way, despite the fact that the child is anatomically well-defined, Storm can decide his or her gender when he or she is old enough to make up his or her mind about what he or she wants to be.

Suffice it to say, Storm's parents have created a pronoun problem, but that's likely to be the least of their child's long-term issues.

In news stories, the couple defended their decision to withhold the gender of their child, saying the idea that the whole world must know what is between the baby's legs is unhealthy, unsafe and voyeuristic. We know - and we're keeping it clean, safe, healthy and private (not secret!).

Voyeuristic? Really?

That's an accusation that might say more about the parents than the folks who are curious about the child's gender. Is it creepy to want to know a baby's gender, or is it creepy that you think people want to know because they're thinking about your child's genitalia and not his personhood? (Sorry. His or her.)

Medical and psychological professionals who commented on the story noted that the parents' political motives likely would have serious consequences for the child's mental and emotional health.

They may think it's kitschy and cool to keep their child's gender private, but Storm may think otherwise when he or she faces an identity crisis that consumes his or her emotional energy.

It would be easy to write off Storm's parents as oddballs with extreme progressive notions about parenting, but the fact is that their views about gender identity are increasingly evident across Western cultures.

Last week brought news from Stockholm of a preschool called Egalia where students are known as friends and not by gender-specific pronouns such as him and her.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Storm Clouds Ahead for More Than 1 Child
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.