Monday Feedback; with the Country Still Mired in the Phone Hacking Scandal That Has Shaken a Media Empire and Brought News-Gathering Methods into Disrepute, Wannabe Hack LUCY ROUE Muses on the Future of Journalism and Where It Leaves Those Looking to Break into the Industry

The Journal (Newcastle, England), July 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Monday Feedback; with the Country Still Mired in the Phone Hacking Scandal That Has Shaken a Media Empire and Brought News-Gathering Methods into Disrepute, Wannabe Hack LUCY ROUE Muses on the Future of Journalism and Where It Leaves Those Looking to Break into the Industry


Byline: LUCY ROUE

IT is without doubt that investigative journalism requires some infringement of privacy, or so argued the editor of The Sunday Times John Witherow yesterday, in a piece entitled Secrets and Lies.

But in the wake of a scandal so vast it has left the public reeling and outraged at the very nature of journalism, there will be those who believe that attempting to justify dishonest practices when they are the "only pathway to the truth" substantiates further all that is wrong with the British tabloids.

To me journalism is not about hacking into the phones of dead schoolgirls, nor is not about 'blagging' bank account details or medical records. And I can only imagine it was the same when those who indulged in such practices began their careers.

In what are desperate times for the newspaper industry, with many regional daily titles in decline and revenues shrinking, it seems contemptible that national tabloids like the News of the World, who were actually making a profit, used unlawful tactics to lure readers.

As I embark on my journalistic training next month, it seems I am getting into the country's most loathed profession, for trust in journalists is at an all-time low. The knock-on effect from the phone hacking saga will be felt throughout the newspaper industry, not least with the plans to replace the self-regulating Press Complaints Commission. I fear the preservation of a free press could be in serious jeopardy.

All of which is a little gloomy when one aspires to be a great journalist. …

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Monday Feedback; with the Country Still Mired in the Phone Hacking Scandal That Has Shaken a Media Empire and Brought News-Gathering Methods into Disrepute, Wannabe Hack LUCY ROUE Muses on the Future of Journalism and Where It Leaves Those Looking to Break into the Industry
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