No Thanks, Mr. Kant

The Wilson Quarterly, Summer 2011 | Go to article overview

No Thanks, Mr. Kant


THE SOURCE: "In Defense of Politics" by Steven B. Smith, in National Affairs, Spring 2011.

THE DREAM OF A WORLD WITHout politics lives on. It would be a world without national governments, ruled by international law. German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), who did much to shape this ideal, believed that the application of universal moral law would create a world in which "our moral duties and obligations respect no national boundaries or other parochial attachments such as race, class, or ethnicity," writes Yale political scientist Steven B. Smith.

Leaving aside the fact that our limited experience with international organizations does not invite confidence, Smith contends that the quest for a depoliticized world is a dangerous delusion. Such a quest would seek to strip the world and its people of the particular--local traditions, habits, and proclivities--in the name of an abstract cosmopolitan ideal.

Smith allows that all these things--which are what make humans political beings--do have a dark side. But the cost of Kant's world without politics would be too high. It would be as if everyone were asked to give up their native tongues and speak only Esperanto. The gain in increased communication would be outweighed by the losses. Who, Smith asks, "is the Shakespeare of Esperanto?"

A world without local culture and traditions "can lead only to moral decay, an inability or unwillingness to dedicate one's life to ideals, to the relatively few things that matter and that give life wholeness and meaning," Smith writes. …

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