Close-Up on France's Shame

By Newhouse, Alana | Newsweek, July 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

Close-Up on France's Shame


Newhouse, Alana, Newsweek


Byline: Alana Newhouse; Newhouse is editor in chief of Tablet magazine.

New Holocaust film reveals a family's tragic secret.

"I've heard about this idea of Holocaust fatigue, but to be honest I do not understand it," said Gilles Paquet-Brenner, the director of Sarah's Key. Paquet-Brenner was referring to the sense, expressed in hushed tones in certain corners of Hollywood, that recent decades have seen the production of too many films about the destruction of European Jewry. That this young director cannot even comprehend the phenomenon may be the key to the success of his latest offering.

Adapted from a bestselling book by Tatiana de Rosnay, Sarah's Key tells the story of an American journalist named Julia Jarmond, played by Kristin Scott Thomas with masterful, never-schmaltzy emotionalism, whose life becomes unexpectedly enmeshed with that of a young girl swept up in the infamous 1942 Vel' d'Hiv Roundup. Over two days, more than 13,000 Jews were confined in the Velodrome d'Hiver, Paris's indoor-cycling racetrack. Nearly all were later shipped to Auschwitz.

Julia, whose French architect-husband has begun refurbishing a Paris apartment inherited from his parents, first learned about the roundup while covering its 60th anniversary. A new assignment inspires her to return to the story, especially since the magazine's young staffers have never heard of the Vel' d'Hiv. When a photographer questions why, given the Germans' penchant for documentation, there is only one grainy photograph of the event, Julia bites back: "This was not the Germans. …

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