Centennial Awards Presented

Manitoba History, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

Centennial Awards Presented


At its Annual General Meeting, the MHS presented awards to two organizations that have operated continuously in Manitoba for over 100 years, along with one centennial business.

The Brandon Young Women's Christian Association opened in 1907, in a three-storey building on 14th Street. Two years later, the organization moved to a new site on 11th Street and the Brandon YWCA was formally incorporated by an Act of the Provincial Legislature. A building at 148-11th Street was unveiled in 1917, built in part with a $10,000 bequest from the estate of Brandon businessman Henry Meredith, who had arrived in Brandon in 1883 and made his fortune as an insurance agent and broker. In 2002, the building was named Meredith Place in recognition of this early support. Through the years, the Brandon YWCA has offered a variety of services to the community, including a Business Girls' Club; a New Canadians Club; wartime services; classes in English language, self-improvement, employment, and literacy; teen clubs, and a day care. Y's Choice Consignment Shop offered clothing and household goods between 1962 and 2002, and the Westman Women's Shelter opened on the third floor in 1978. In particular, the YWCA has been a safe refuge for rural women who moved into the city for job training and employment. Since the 1980s, Meredith Place with its 21 bedrooms has served women and men in need of housing. An MHS Centennial Organization Award was presented to Nickole Wlasichuk on behalf of the Brandon YWCA.

Designed by Winnipeg school architect J. B. Mitchell and named for the British military general Frederick Roberts (1832-1914), Lord Roberts School was built in 1910 at the intersection of John Street (now Daly Street South) and Beresford Avenue, at a cost of about $90,000. Its 16 classrooms were designed to accommodate up to 700 students. The school opened in January 1911. A second building was added along Beresford Avenue, with eight more classrooms, in April 1920. It featured an auditorium complete with stage. The longest wing ran along Beresford. A smaller north wing with three classrooms and washroom facilities ran behind Building 1, with playground space between the two schools. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Centennial Awards Presented
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.